CJA 475 Strategic Plan Forecasting, Evaluation, and Assessment

City of Scottsdale

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About Crime Analysis

The Crime Analysis Unit provides statistical information in three different areas: Administrative, Strategic and Tactical.

  • Administrative Crime Analysis involves long range projects. Tasks include providing economic, geographic and law enforcement information to police management, city hall, city council, and neighborhood/citizen groups. Its purpose is financial, organizational, political, and legislative. It is critical to budget, personnel, public information, and legal issues.
  • Strategic Crime Analysis is concerned with operational strategies and seeks solutions to on-going problems. It provides information for resource allocation purposes, including patrol scheduling and beat configuration. Its purpose is to identify unusual crime activities over certain levels or at different seasonal times, identify unusual community conditions, provide police service more effectively and efficiently by matching demands for service with service delivery, reduce and/or eliminate recurring problems, and assist in community policing or problem oriented policing
  • Tactical Crime Analysis deals with immediate criminal offenses to promote quick response. It provides information to assist operational personnel in the identification of specific crime trends and in the arrest of criminal offenders. The primary goal is to identify crime trends and patterns/series. Tactical information links offender and modus operendi information from a number of offenses in an attempt to provide investigative leads, help solve crimes, and clear cases after apprehension and arrests.

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STRATEGIC PLAN

2014/15 – 2019/20

SCOTTSDALE POLICE DEPARTMENT

STRATEGIC PLAN

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S

MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF 1 THE PLANNIN G PROCESS 2 MISS ION AN D VIS ION OF THE DE PARTMENT 3 ORGANIZATION OVE RVIE W 4 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION 7 STRATE GIC DIRE CTION 1: REDUCIN G CRIME FOR A SAFER COMMUNITY 8 STRATE GIC DIRE CTION 2: PARTNERING WITH THE COMMUNITY TO IN CRE ASE PUBLIC SAFE TY 11 STRATE GIC DIRE CTION 3: H IRIN G, INVE STIN G AND RETAIN ING QUALITY EMPLOYEE S TO PROVIDE E XCEPTION AL CUSTOME R SERVICE 13 STRATE GIC DIRE CTION 4: BUILDIN G A COLLABORATIVE WORKFORCE FOR ENHAN CED EFFE CTIVENE SS AND E FF ICIE NCIES 15 STRATE GIC DIRE CTION 5: PLAN NIN G FACILITIE S FOR FUTURE GROWTH 17 STRATE GIC DIRE CTION 6: ADVAN CIN G TE CHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS FOR EN HANCED PUBLIC SAFE TY 19 ACKN OWLE DGMEN TS 23

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

M E S S A G E F R O M T H E C H I E F It is my pleasure to present the 10th Scottsdale Police

Department Strategic Plan (2014/15-2019/20). This document

is built on the foundation of past successes and combined

with a vision for the future of our Department and our

community. The strategies identified in this plan are the

product of three different planning retreats and determined

to be priorities as a part of our in-depth planning process.

This five-year plan encompasses the Department’s

commitment to community concerns through six Strategic

Directions. These directions include enhancing capabilities,

building and enhancing community partnerships, investing

and retaining in exceptional employees who are skilled and

efficient in their duties, and advancing technological solutions

while planning for future growth.

I encourage you to review the included Strategic Plan initiatives, which reaffirm our commitment to the

citizens to be proactive in our police services and continually strive to enhance the safety and quality of

life here in the City of Scottsdale.

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 1 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

T H E P L A N N I N G P R O C E S S

The strategic planning process allows our Department to establish a vision for the future and develop

planned, well-defined objectives and strategies to accomplish our goals. The strategic plan serves as a

5-Year “roadmap” that steers the Department and promotes effective resource allocation and budget

planning. The plan is a “living document” that is regularly reviewed and updated to reflect current

community issues, organizational goals and the state of the economy.

The 2014 strategic plan involved three retreats (please refer to page 6 for more information) with

attendees representing all levels of the Police Department and other city departments. These retreats

encompass a ground up process of reflection, evaluation, and new directions that best reflect the

agencies mission and vision. The process involved a review of key inputs, Strengths, Weaknesses,

Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis, a review of the existing mission and vision statement,

brainstorming to identify additional strategies, modification of existing strategies, and prioritization of

strategic issues.

R E V I E W O F I N P U T S

Prior to and during the retreats, attendees reviewed several key inputs that would serve as a guide

during the planning process. The review covered:

 City demographic, financial, and economic trends.

 Crime trends and calls for service data.

 Key accomplishments and strategic plan progress.

 Personnel and available resources.

 City capital improvement projects and residential/commercial development plans.

 Police Department budget allocations.

Attendees considered these inputs while reviewing and making adjustments to the strategic plan

throughout the retreats.

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 2 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

Mission •Is a statement of the general purpose of the organization.

Vision •Is an image of how the organization desires to operate in the future.

Strategic Directions

•Are derived from the Department’s Mission & Vision & are high-level statements of what the organization desires to achieve.

Objectives

•Are derived from & support the stated Strategic Directions. Objectives are statements of the general

means by which the organization will work to meet the Strategic Directions.

Strategies

•Are statements of how each Objective will be addressed. Strategies might incorporate multiple initiatives or projects, & are designed to produce measurable results.

OUR MISSION

“The Scottsdale Police Department, in partnership with the citizens of Scottsdale, recognizes the changing needs

of our community and law enforcement’s role in addressing those needs. Furthermore, we pledge

EXCELLENCE, INITIATIVE AND INTEGRITY to enhance the quality of life throughout our City knowing those we serve

deserve no less.”

OUR VISION

We are known as a community that is safe and

secure and have reduced the fear of crime for all of our

citizens and visitors.

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 3 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

O r g a n i z a t i o n a l O v e r v i e w The Scottsdale Police Department proudly serves the City of Scottsdale, a vibrant southwest community that as of

July 31, 2014 has a population of 225,698a persons in an area approximately 185 square miles, stretching 31 miles

from north to south. The Department remains a progressive and innovative law enforcement agency, possessing

strong values that emphasize ethical behavior, principled decision-making, commitment to serving the community

and an appreciation for diversity. The organization is proud to be nationally accredited by the Commission on

Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, reflecting the commitment of the Department to constantly improve

the quality of service provided to the citizens of Scottsdale.

a Population Arizona Department of Administration – Office of Employment and Population Statistics T R E N D S I N P O P U L A T I O N , W O R K L O A D & A N T I C I P A T E D P E R S O N N E L

In developing this strategic plan, the Department conducted both an internal and external analysis to identify

trends and factors that might possibly impact the successful implementation of the plan. This included a review of

population trends, demographics, available resources, and level of demand for police services. During review, the

following key trends and factors were identified:

 By 2020, the population of Scottsdale will have increased approximately 11% (forecasting an annual growth

rate of 1.83%).

 Citizen-generated and Officer-initiated calls for service will remain fairly stable or slightly increase.

 The largest resident population of the City will remain in the Central Area (Indian Bend Road to Deer Valley Road) of the city

 Tourism will remain a pillar to Scottsdale’s economy.

 Land use is approximately 48% residential, 43% Open Space, 6% industrial/commercial, and 4% mixed use.

 The City’s revitalization efforts in the Downtown Scottsdale and Greater Airpark areas will impact the

Department’s workload and policing strategies over the next few years. The revitalization includes new mixed- use commercial, retail, and residential developments in both the Downtown and Airpark areas, with expected population growth.

 FY2014/15 positions adopted: 413 sworn, 246.6 civilian employees, 664.6 total.

 FY2014/15 authorized Officers per 1,000 population: 1.83.  FY2014/15 authorized civilian employees per 1,000 population: 1.10.

Sources: City of Scottsdale: Planning, Neighborhood & Transportation Division, Financial Services Division, Public Safety Division & Maricopa Association of Governments. Calculations based on Maricopa Association of Governments 2013 Socioeconomic Projections. For Official Population, please refer to the Arizona Department of Administration Office of Employment and Population Statistics.

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 4 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

A S S U M P T I O N S This plan was developed under the assumption that it would be implemented under a somewhat stable

environment. However, significant changes to the environment could impact successful implementation, which is

based on the following key assumptions:

 Southern Scottsdale (south of Indian Bend Road) and Downtown Scottsdale are the established, more mature parts of Scottsdale. The southernmost part of this area contains neighborhoods typical of the 1950’s, 1960’s, and early 1970’s. The northern part of the area contains large, master-planned communities built in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. Much of the City’s retail, entertainment, and office activities are located in this area.

 The central Scottsdale area (Indian Bend Road north to Deer Valley Road) includes a combination of mature

neighborhoods and newer developments, with several major master-planned communities, as well as high density single-family homes, town homes, condominiums, and apartments. Central Scottsdale includes the Greater Airpark Area, Scottsdale airport, regional commercial and employment uses.

 The north part of the City (North of Deer Valley Road) includes several newer large master-planned communities, many with golf courses. The area is a lower density, high-desert environment with relatively little commercial development. The area includes 30,165 acres of the McDowell Sonoran Preserve, along with major landholdings, and large undeveloped tracts of land still controlled by the Arizona State Land Department.

 The Greater Scottsdale Airpark is the 6th largest employment center in Arizona, with nearly 38,600 employees (surveyed from employers with 5 or more employees) in over 1,269 businesses; with major notable employers like Vanguard, The Fairmont Scottsdale Princess, GoDaddy Software Inc., International Cruise Excursions Inc. and The Henkel Corporation. The Airpark is home to Scottsdale Airport, the busiest single-runway, general aviation airport in the country and the largest corporate jet facility in Arizona.

 Other employment areas are nestled in the heart of McCormick Ranch and boasts nearly 23,800 employees (surveyed from employers with 5 or more employees) in over 800 businesses; with major notable employers like Scottsdale Insurance Company, Hyatt Regency Scottsdale, Scottsdale Healthcare, and CVS Pharmacy Inc. The Southern Scottsdale employment area is anchored by SkySong: The ASU Center for Innovation and major employers like McKesson, Yelp, Ticketmaster, the City of Scottsdale and Scottsdale Healthcare.

 Homeland Security issues will continue to evolve requiring an all-hazards approach to prevent and

respond to natural and man-made disasters.

 Calendar years 2009/ 2010 provided the first sign of economic recovery for Scottsdale since the start of the Great Recession in 2007, and at a broader level, for the national economy also. Today, Arizona is expected lag behind the national recovery, and the recovery will be modest.

 It is expected that Scottsdale will continue to have one of the lowest unemployment rates in the

metropolitan area. Sources: City of Scottsdale: Planning, Neighborhood & Transportation Division, Community & Economic Development Division, Public

Safety Division & Maricopa Association of Governments.

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 5 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

S W O T A N A L Y S I S

Facilitators conducted a Strengths,

Weaknesses, Opportunities, and

Threats (SWOT) analysis allowing

attendees to brainstorm and

exchange ideas about the positives

and negatives inside and outside of

the organization. The analysis

provided perspective and was utilized

as a resource throughout the

strategic planning process.

R E V I E W & U P D A T E O F T H E 5 – Y E A R P L A N

The 2013/14 strategic planning process marked the Department’s 10th consecutive year of success with our

strategic planning initiative. The department hosted three retreats to gather valuable information in developing

this plan: The Police Technology Forum, The Strategic Plan Annual Update, and the Crime Reduction Forum. During

these retreats, attendees focused on reviewing and updating the existing 5-Year plan. A review of the

Department’s mission and vision statement was completed in which the department confirmed the commitment

to the mission statement and re-evaluated the vision to create a succinct and direct statement as reflected

previously in this document. At the conclusion of the multiple retreats, employees developed new strategic

directions that better suited the future direction of the department.

P R I O R I T I Z A T I O N

After the retreat, the Chief and command staff worked to prioritize the newly aggregated list of strategies, position

them on a 5-year calendar, and identify funding requirements and status. Strategies were positioned by quarter

and assigned strategy leaders responsible for implementation. Strategy leaders then worked with command staff

to develop strategy definitions, measures of success, and action plans for each strategy.

Strengths Weaknesses

Threats Opportunities

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 6 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

I M P L E M E N T A T I O N & E V A L U A T I O N S P O N S O R S H I P & A C C O U N T A B I L I T Y

The ownership and dedication to the strategic plan can be observed throughout all of the Scottsdale Police

Department. The Chief of Police is committed and oversees the success and implementation of the plan in its

entirety, ensuring accountability throughout the rest of the department. Assistant Chiefs oversee the continued

efforts of the Strategic Directions as sponsors of the six directions. Command Staff, Department Commanders and

Civilian Directors, take personal responsibility in sponsorship over the Strategic Objectives. Mid-level managers of

the department, comprised of lieutenants, sergeants, and civilian managers, supervisors, and senior analysts, act

as strategy leaders, creating and overseeing teams of employees who work together to accomplish and follow

through the identified strategies of the department. Through the combined sponsorship of all levels of police

employees we ensure the accountability of our department to the efforts of this strategic plan.

S T R A T E G I C P L A N R E V I E W , T R A C K I N G & M E A S U R E M E N T

The Strategic Plan and its process are facilitated by the Planning, Research and Accreditation division of the

Operational Services Bureau. This includes hosting the retreats in which this plan was created, coordinating the

continued operation of the tool, creating and updating regular reports of progress and providing updates to the

department and community.

Progress toward the strategic plan is reviewed and tracked using an internal tool that is updated by strategy

leaders on a monthly basis. The tracking tool contains detailed information about Department strategies, and

includes key accomplishments, percent complete, current status, timelines, history of extensions and any issues

that need to be addressed. The internal tracking tool is used to produce reports that are reviewed by the Chief

and top staff at monthly status meetings. These meetings provide a forum for recognizing accomplishments and

open discussion if a sponsor or strategy leader indicates they need resolution of issues or resource assistance to

keep the strategy “on-schedule”. In addition to the monthly update process, the tracking tool is used for the

generation of quarterly progress reports that highlight “Key Accomplishments” during each quarter. These reports

are reviewed at quarterly management meetings, and are distributed department-wide via the “PoliceLine”

newsletter, ensuring continued work on the strategic plan.

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 7 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

A N N U A L R E P O R T S

In addition to this document that stands as the official strategic plan for the five year period, there is an annual

report documenting the active strategies for each of the five fiscal years. This report includes information about

the strategy leader, measures of success, as well as the leaders assigned to the strategies. This report structure

allows for a regular update to the planning process and is available to view on the Department’s website. There

will be a total of five additional reports at the conclusion of this plan, allowing the public to be kept up to date with

the progress and purpose behind each of the identified strategies throughout the five year cycle.

At the conclusion of the year, a performance report is prepared and also available to view online. The report

provides information on the progress and status of each strategy initiated that fiscal year. These reports are

available for download from the City’s website at http://www.scottsdaleps.com.

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 8 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

1 . 0 R E D U C I N G C R I M E F O R A S A F E R C O M M U N I T Y

1 . 1 E n h a n c e E x t e r n a l L a w E n f o r c e m e n t R e l a t i o n s h i p s 1 . 2 P r o m o t e Y o u t h I n t e r v e n t i o n I n i t i a t i v e s 1 . 3 E n h a n c e F o r e n s i c s C a p a b i l i t i e s 1 . 4 U t i l i z e I n t e l – L e d P o l i c i n g 1 . 5 U p d a t e S u r v e i l l a n c e T e c h n o l o g y 1 . 6 E n h a n c e S u s p e c t D e t e c t i o n , A p p r e h e n s i o n , a n d

P r o s e c u t i o n

S p on s o red b y:

C m d r . B r u c e C i o l l i ( 1 . 6 ) D i r . S t e v e G a r r e t t ( 1 . 1 & 1 . 3 )

C m d r . T o m H e n n y ( 1 . 2 , 1 . 4 , & 1 . 5 )

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 9 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

1 . 1 E n h a n c e E x t e r n a l L a w E n f o r c e m e n t R e l a t i o n s h i p s

Funding Strategies Year Status 1.1.1 Explore an initiative to share local lab DNA data between agencies. 1* NF/GR

1.1.2 Evaluate and enhance communication and collaboration with other agencie and task forces, Local & Federal.

2 ER

1 . 2 P r o m o t e Y o u t h I n t e r v e n t i o n I n i t i a t i v e s

Funding Strategies Year Status 1.2.1 Develop a juvenile diversion program for alternatives to arrest. 2* ER

1.2.2 Create collaborative youth intervention programs and initiatives to reduce criminal activity by juveniles.

2 ER

1.2.3 Establish a process to identify and target at-risk youth for potential intervention.

2 ER

1 . 3 E n h a n c e F o r e n s i c s C a p a b i l i t i e s Funding Strategies Year Status 1.3.1 Enhance evidence collection and processing capabilities for improved case

clearance. 1 ER

1.3.2 Research data/intelligence gathering (i.e., smart phones/tablets) for increased investigative leads

1 ER

1.3.3 Evaluate options for advancement of storage capabilities and digital evidence lab.

2 RICO

1.3.4 Identify trainig needs for a Forensic Digital Evidence Lab and technology for improved investigations and defensible court testimony.

1 NF/GR

1.3.5 Review and propose methods to receive and view streaming video. 2 RICO

1.3.6 Establish a forensic computer lab to address increased demand. 5 RICO

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19 *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 1 0 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

1 . 4 U t i l i z e I n t e l – L e d P o l i c i n g

Funding Strategies Year Status 1.4.1 Explore implementing a real-time crime center for increased response and

tactical decision making. 2 ER/CIP

1 . 5 U p d a t e S u r v e i l l a n c e T e c h n o l o g y Funding Strategies Year Status 1.5.1 Explore citywide CCTV program in public areas to deter criminal activity and

provide investigative leads. 5 CIP

1.5.2 Improve camera surveillance in remote areas to augment public safety.

3 NF

1.5.3 Research feasibility, benefits, & procurement options of an aeiral surveillance platform.

1 GR/ER

1.5.4 Expand private/public partnerships to share streaming video. 2 NF

1.5.5 Transmit video to command/responsive units (event cameras). 1 NF

1 . 6 E n h a n c e S u s p e c t D e t e c t i o n , A p p r e h e n s i o n , & P r o s e c u t i o n

Funding Strategies Year Status 1.6.1 Explore adding another fully staffed Bike Unit to address city-wide workload. 3 RICO

1.6.2 Evaluate computer crime trends and investigate staffing needs to ensure appropriate service delivery.

2 ER

1.6.3 Evaluate Ccrime analysis program expansion 2 ER

1.6.4 Improve service delivery for poperty crimes through enhanced staffing and process efficiencies.

1 ER

Legend

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19 *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 1 1 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

2 . 0 P a r t n e r i n g W i t h t h e C o m m u n i t y t o I n c r e a s e P u b l i c

S a f e t y

2 . 1 D e v e l o p B u s i n e s s O u t r e a c h P r o g r a m s 2 . 2 E n h a n c e P u b l i c O u t r e a c h A n d C o m m u n i t y R e l a t i o n s 2 . 3 D e v e l o p C r i m e R e d u c t i o n O u t r e a c h P r o g r a m s

S p on s o red b y:

C m d r . R o n B a y n e

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 1 2 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

2 . 1 D e v e l o p B u s i n e s s O u t r e a c h P r o g r a m s Funding Strategies Year Status 2.1.1 Evaluate and enhance partnership opportunities with businesses. 2 ER

2.1.2 Evaluate and enhance direct citizen/business contact program.

2 ER

2.1.3 Partner with pharmacies on methods to secure pharmaceutical stock.

2 ER

2 . 2 E n h a n c e P u b l i c O u t r e a c h A n d C o m m u n i t y R e l a t i o n s Funding Strategies Year Status 2.2.1 Establish an “open house” initiative to increase and strengthen community

relations.

2 ER

2.2.2 Increase community outreach for current crime activity and educate public on emerging crime trends.

1 ER

2.2.3 Establish a 911 education program.

2 ER

2.2.4 Strategically market SPD brand and showcase talents/successes.

2 ER

2.2.5 Enhance customer service delivery to citizens at the district station lobbies. 2 ER

2 . 3 D e v e l o p C r i m e R e d u c t i o n O u t r e a c h P r o g r a m s

Funding Strategies Year Status 2.3.1 Make CPTED part of the City’s planning approval process.

4 ER

2.3.2 Introduce a consequence based marketing campaign.

2 ER

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19 *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 1 3 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

3 . 0 H i r i n g , I n v e s t i n g a n d R e t a i n i n g Q u a l i t y E m p l o y e e s

t o P r o v i d e E x c e p t i o n a l C u s t o m e r S e r v i c e

3 . 1 C r e a t e C r o s s – D i v i s i o n a l L e a r n i n g O p p o r t u n i t i e s 3 . 2 E n h a n c e S e r v i c e D e l i v e r y & S u c c e s s i o n P l a n n i n g 3 . 3 E n h a n c e T r a i n i n g 3 . 4 L e v e r a g e A l t e r n a t i v e R e c r u i t m e n t M e t h o d s

S p on s o red b y:

M g r . L i s a A n g e l i n i ( 3 . 4 ) C m d r . C h r i s H a l l ( 3 . 1 )

C m d r . A a r o n M i n o r ( 3 . 2 ) C m d r . R i c h S l a v i n ( 3 . 3 )

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 1 4 ]

S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

3 . 1 C r e a t e C r o s s – D i v i s i o n a l L e a r n i n g O p p o r t u n i t i e s Funding Strategies Year Status

3.1.1 Develop a cross-divisional education and training program across bureaus.

1 ER

3 . 2 E n h a n c e S e r v i c e D e l i v e r y & S u c c e s s i o n P l a n n i n g Funding Strategies Year Status 3.2.1 Create formalized mentoring plan for sworn & civiliian employees.

2* ER

3.2.2 Create and implement a sworn structured “Officer In Charge” program.

1* ER

3 . 3 E n h a n c e T r a i n i n g Funding Strategies Year Status 3.3.1 Conduct “High Density Property” Response training.

2 ER

3.3.2 Create and implement an “Alternative Delivery” training program (to include technology, scheduling, etc.)

1* OP

3.3.3 Asses the training unit & evaluate benefits of acquiring additional full-time instructor position.

1* NF

3.3.4 Integrate civilian staff in the training unit 3 NF

3.3.5 Enhance employee Well Care programs. 2 NF

3 . 4 L e v e r a g e A l t e r n a t i v e R e c r u i t m e n t M e t h o d s

Funding Strategies Year Status 3.4.1 Develop a formalized and sustainable internship program.

1 ER

3.4.2 Develop a comprehensive recruitment approach and outreach team.

1 ER

3.4.3 Explore benefits of instituting an Unpaid Reserve program. 3 ER

3.4.4 Partner with Community College Academy to identify potential recruits. 1 ER

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19 *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

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4 . 0 B u i l d i n g a C o l l a b o r a t i v e W o r k f o r c e f o r E n h a n c e d

E f f e c t i v e n e s s a n d E f f i c i e n c i e s

4 . 1 E n h a n c e O r g a n i z a t i o n a l E f f e c t i v e s s t h r o u g h T e a m w o r k

4 . 2 I d e n t i f y E f f i c i e n c i e s a n d I m p r o v e m e n t s

S p on s o red b y:

D i r . W i l l D a v i s ( 4 . 2 ) C m d r . R i c h S l a v i n ( 4 . 1 )

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4 . 1 E n h a n c e O r g a n i z a t i o n a l E f f e c t i v e n e s s t h r o u g h T e a m w o r k

Funding Strategies Year Status 4.1.1 Enhance internal department communication process.

1 ER

4.1.2 Enhance the Departments employee recognition process for increased employee engagement.

1* ER

4 . 2 A d v a n c e T e c h n o l o g y S o l u t i o n s Funding Strategies Year Status 4.2.1 Initiate a team to conduct process map workflows to improve efficiencies. 1 ER

4.2.2 Research increase in service delivery, and efficiencies, by enhancing civilian specialization in units.

2 ER

4.2.3 Establish a process to ensure annual evaluation of task force involvement & outcomes.

3 ER

4.2.4 Asses Internal Audit Options

5 ER

4.2.5 Institute a consistent and sustainable workload analysis process for all organizational components.

1* ER

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19 *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

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5 . 0 P l a n n i n g F a c i l i t i e s f o r F u t u r e G r o w t h

5 . 1 P l a n F o r F a c i l i t y I m p r o v e m e n t A n d D e s i g n 5 . 2 C o o r d i n a t e S t a f f i n g a n d O r g a n i z a t i o n a l C h a n g e s

W i t h E x i s t i n g S p a c e N e e d s A n d F u t u r e G r o w t h P l a n s

S p on s o red b y:

D i r . T o m M e l t o n

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5 . 1 P l a n F o r F a c i l i t y I m p r o v e m e n t A n d D e s i g n Funding Strategies Year Status 5.1.1 Develop a plan for facility needs that includes consideration for type and

number of staff housed and unit needs, allows for organizational change and reassignment options, and ensures user-end involvement.

4* NF

5.1.2 Consolidate jail services into one location. * —

5 . 2 C o o r d i n a t e S t a f f i n g A n d O r g a n i z a t i o n a l C h a n g e s W i t h E x i s t i n g S p a c e N e e d s A n d F u t u r e G r o w t h P l a n s

Funding Strategies Year Status 5.2.1 Evaluate current space use for effective and efficient repurposing. 4* NF

. * = Strategy continuing from previous fiscal year.

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19

 Completed *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

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6 . 0 A d v a n c i n g T e c h n o l o g y S o l u t i o n s f o r E n h a n c e d

P u b l i c S a f e t y

6 . 1 E v a l u a t e W e b S o l u t i o n s 6 . 2 U p d a t e R a d i o T e c h n o l o g y 6 . 3 E x p a n d D a t a S t o r a g e S o l u t i o n s 6 . 4 E n h a n c e I n t e l / I n f o G a t h e r i n g 6 . 5 E n h a n c e 9 1 1 C a p a b i l i t i e s 6 . 6 R e s e a r c h & I m p l e m e n t A p p l i c a t i o n s F o r A M o r e

E f f i c i e n t W o r k P l a c e 6 . 7 L e v e r a g e D a t a b a s e I n t e g r a t i o n O p p o r t u n i t i e s 6 . 8 P u r s u e I n n o v a t i v e M o b i l e W i r e l e s s

S o l u t i o n s / P l a t f o r m s

S p on s o red b y:

D i r . S t e v e G a r r e t t ( 6 . 3 ) C m d r . T o m H e n n y ( 6 . 4 )

D i r . M i c h a e l K e r a n ( 6 . 1 , 6 . 6 , 6 . 7 , & 6 . 8 ) D i r . T o m M e l t o n ( 6 . 2 & 6 . 5 )

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6 . 1 E v a l u a t e W e b S o l u t i o n s

Funding Strategies Year Status

6.1.1 Improve internal PD Web for bulletins, Policeline newsletter, & department-

wide E-mails. 2 ER

6.1.2 Explore alternatives to allow citizens to obtain Public Records online. 2 ER

6.1.3 Evaluate costs and benefits of licensing Justice Web Interface (JWI) on all desktops.

3 ER

6 . 2 U p d a t e R a d i o T e c h n o l o g y

Funding Strategies Year Status

6.2.1 Pursue wireless radio solutions options (accessories). 2 OP

6.2.2 Research costs and benefits of “on-officer” GPS capability. 2 ER

6.2.3 Develop seamless communication plan and identify gaps for inter-agency operations.

2 ER

6 . 3 E x p a n d D a t a S t o r a g e S o l u t i o n s

Funding Strategies Year Status

6.3.1 Centralize data storage solutions and plan for disaster recovery while

exploring cloud storage solutions. 3 ER

6.3.2 Exlore digital evidence storage and video solutions. 2 ER

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19 *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

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6 . 4 E n h a n c e I n t e l / I n f o G a t h e r i n g

Funding Strategies Year Status

6.4.1 Purchase facial recognition technology. 5 ER

6.4.2 Examine use of social media. 1 ER

6.4.3 Evaluate and acquire internet wire-tap software to meet investigative and legal requirements.

4 ER/NF

6 . 5 E n h a n c e 9 1 1 C a p a b i l i t i e s Funding Strategies Year Status

6.5.1 Explore alternative to implement a solution to receive 911 text information into

Dispatch. 2 ER

6.5.2 Research and recommend methods to provide for Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD) to Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD).

4 ER

6 . 6 R e s e a r c h & I m p l e m e n t A p p l i c a t i o n s F o r A M o r e E f f i c i e n t W o r k P l a c e

Funding Strategies Year Status

6.6.1 Evaluate scheduling software options and recommend options. 3 ER

6.6.2 Asses benefits and providers for redaction software.  —

6.6.3 Establish or enhance utilization of technology for vitural meetings. 3 ER

6.6.4 Explore methods to develop group task lists/workflows. 2 ER

6.6.5 Assesss the benefit & feasibility of implementing Microsoft SharePoint server technology department wide.

3* ER

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19

 Completed *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

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6 . 7 L e v e r a g e D a t a b a s e I n t e g r a t i o n O p p o r t u n i t i e s

Funding Strategies Year Status

6.7.1 Implement a Lab and Records Integration Project (LIMS). 2 OP

6.7.2 Evaluate, prioritize and implement systems integration between Police Records Management, Court Systems and disposition reporting, and other criminal justice databases as appropriate.

3 ER

6 . 8 P u r s u e I n n o v a t i v e M o b i l e W i r e l e s s S o l u t i o n s / P l a t f o r m s

Funding Strategies Year Status

6.8.1 Research benefits of individually assigned mobile connected devices

(tablets/iPads). 2 ER

6.8.2 Identify wearable/mobile computer solutions and possible applications and benefits.

3 ER

6.8.3 Explore possible alternatives to access ACJIS and CFS data on mobile devices (Smart Phones/Tablets) and make recommendations for implementation.

3 GR

Year Funding Status 1= FY 2014/15 2= FY 2015/16 3= FY 2016/17 4= FY 2017/18 5= FY 2018/19 *Continued Strategy from Prior Plan

ER = Existing Resources NF = Not Funded OP = Operating GR = Grant SF = Self Funded CIP = Capital Improvement Project RICO= Assets seized via Racketeer-Influenced & Corrupt Organization Act

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A C K N O W L E D G M E N T S

The Department would like to express thanks to the following individuals who provided input into the development of the 2014/15-2019/20 Strategic Plan through their participation in the various retreats. We acknowledge the valuable contributions of all who participated in the process, and have made our best attempt below to include all of those involved with updating the plan.

P A R T I C I P A N T S Nick Alamshaw Sue Caughey Helen Gandara Cassie Johnson Tom Myers Rich Slavin

Christy Alonzo Bruce Ciolli Steve Garrett Richard Keilich Darcy Nichols Kay Smith

Dianne Anderson Mark Clark Burl Haenel Michael Keran Kevin Orvis Scott Smith

Ernie Anderson John Cocca Kevin Hansen Joe Kertesz Evan Polasky Karen Sutherland

Mike Anderson Steve Cohen Jennifer Hagen Jeff Landrum Melissa Polopoli Jeff Trillo

Lisa Angelini Scott Curtis Susan Hagen-Smith Todd Larson Tracie Paolillo Henry Turrey

Ron Bayne Thomas Davidson Chris Hall Joe LeDuc Scott Popp Jeff Walther

Chris Beckius Will Davis Dustin Hawkinson Michelle Lefay Leah Peller Mark Walther

Mary Bertuccelli James Dear Aaron Henderson Bob Manning Steve Randall Jimmy Wasson

Chris Blumling Lisa Dilbeck Chris Henningson Larry Marmie, Jr. Eric Rasmussen Eric Williams

Bob Bonnette Sean Duggan Tom Henny Joel Martinez-Goodnetter Matt Roadifer Tracy Wilkinson

Bryan Brown Alex Dyer Bryan Hiner Gene MacClanahan Dan Rincon Mike Winslow

Jamie Buckler Matt Evans Robert Horton Chris McDowell Beau Robins Janet Wraspir

Carrie Candler Susan Frausto Ben Hoster Tom Melton Alan Rodbell Adam Yaron

Kris Cano Brian Freeman Paul Hruby Aaron Minor Luis Santaella John Zobel

Mark Carpenter Pam Foster Tommy Jensen Mike Morrison Wes Shaffer Ben Zweig

R E T R E A T S F A C I L I T A T E D B Y

P a u l B e n t l e y K r i s t i U t t e r

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S C O T T S D A L E P O L I C E D E P A R T M E N T

City of Scottsdale CITY COUNCIL

W.J. “Jim” Lane

MAYOR Suzanne Klapp Virginia Korte Kathy Littlefield

COUNCILMEMBER COUNCILMEMBER COUNCILMEMBER Linda Milhaven Guy Phillips David N. Smith

COUNCILMEMBER COUNCILMEMBER COUNCILMEMBER

Fritz Behring

CITY MANAGER

If you have any questions, please contact us at cajohnson@scottsdaleaz.gov and we will be happy to assist you.

Compiled and Edited by Cassie Johnson Police Planning, Research & Accreditation Division

This document is also available in PDF format on our website at www.scottsdalepd.com Scottsdale Police Department

8401 E. Indian School Road Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-312-5000

S T R A T E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 4 / 1 5 – 2 0 1 9 / 2 0 [ 2 5 ]

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
  • MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF
  • It is my pleasure to present the 10th Scottsdale Police Department Strategic Plan (2014/15-2019/20). This document is built on the foundation of past successes and combined with a vision for the future of our Department and our community. The strategi…
  • This five-year plan encompasses the Department’s commitment to community concerns through six Strategic Directions. These directions include enhancing capabilities, building and enhancing community partnerships, investing and retaining in exceptional …
  • I encourage you to review the included Strategic Plan initiatives, which reaffirm our commitment to the citizens to be proactive in our police services and continually strive to enhance the safety and quality of life here in the City of Scottsdale.
  • THE PLANNING PROCESS
  • REVIEW OF INPUTS
  • Organizational Overview
  • TRENDS IN POPULATION, WORKLOAD & ANTICIPATED PERSONNEL
  • ASSUMPTIONS
  • REVIEW & UPDATE OF THE 5-YEAR PLAN
  • PRIORITIZATION
  • IMPLEMENTATION & EVALUATION
  • SPONSORSHIP & ACCOUNTABILITY
  • Strategic Plan Review, Tracking & Measurement
  • Annual Reports
  • Cmdr. Bruce Ciolli (1.6)
  • Dir. Steve Garrett (1.1 & 1.3) Cmdr. Tom Henny (1.2, 1.4, & 1.5)
  • Cmdr. Ron Bayne
  • Mgr. Lisa Angelini (3.4)
  • Cmdr. Chris Hall (3.1)
  • Cmdr. Aaron Minor (3.2)
  • Cmdr. Rich Slavin (3.3)
  • Dir. Will Davis (4.2)
  • Cmdr. Rich Slavin (4.1)
  • Dir. Tom Melton
  • Dir. Steve Garrett (6.3)
  • Cmdr. Tom Henny (6.4)
  • Dir. Michael Keran (6.1, 6.6, 6.7, & 6.8)
  • Dir. Tom Melton (6.2 & 6.5)

Problem Statement

The healthcare spending in the United States in 2016 stood at 3.3 trillion dollars, roughly, 10,348 dollars per individual, representing about 17.9 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 2018). Healthcare expenditure in the United States remains one of the highest worldwide, with hospital care costs and physician and clinical service costs accounting for 32 percent and 20 percent of the overall healthcare spending respectively (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 2018). There is a lot of wastage due to inefficiency and duplication of roles and activities, which increase the duration of care, and ultimately the cost of care (Bughin, Manyika, & Woetzel, 2017). These issues manifest themselves in long patient waiting times especially due to the high number of human interactions that patients have to encounter in healthcare institutions. On average, a patient spends more than two hours to receive medical attention in the United States (Bughin, Manyika, & Woetzel, 2017).

The high cost of healthcare, and the long duration it takes to receive medical attention can be resolved by incorporating technology and automating some aspects of medical care. For instance, as previously mentioned above, the high number of human interactions in the emergency department ultimately manifests itself in the patients’ hospital bill. The same high number of human interactions increases the time it takes for a patient to get medical attention in the healthcare institutions. Automating some services such as collection of patients’ information and the checking of vital signs can greatly reduce the time spent in the emergency department, as well as reducing the overall cost of healthcare (Bughin, Manyika, & Woetzel, 2017).

References

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2018). National health expenditures 2016 highlights. Published January.

Bughin, J., Manyika, J., & Woetzel, J. (2017). A Future That Works: Automation, Employment, and Productivity: McKinsey Global Institute. January 2017.

Problem Statement

Page 3 of 3

[Document title] NAme

Problem Statement

The healthcare spending in the United States in 2016 stood at 3.3 trillion dollars, roughly, 10,348 dollars per individual, representing about 17.9 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 2018). Healthcare expenditure in the United States remains one of the highest worldwide, with hospital care costs and physician and clinical service costs accounting for 32 percent and 20 percent of the overall healthcare spending respectively (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 2018). There is a lot of wastage due to inefficiency and duplication of roles and activities, which increase the duration of care, and ultimately the cost of care (Bughin, Manyika, & Woetzel, 2017). These issues manifest themselves in long patient waiting times especially due to the high number of human interactions that patients have to encounter in healthcare institutions. On average, a patient spends more than two hours to receive medical attention in the United States (Bughin, Manyika, & Woetzel, 2017).

The high cost of healthcare, and the long duration it takes to receive medical attention can be resolved by incorporating technology and automating some aspects of medical care. For instance, as previously mentioned above, the high number of human interactions in the emergency department ultimately manifests itself in the patients’ hospital bill. The same high number of human interactions increases the time it takes for a patient to get medical attention in the healthcare institutions. Automating some services such as collection of patients’ information and the checking of vital signs can greatly reduce the time spent in the emergency department, as well as reducing the overall cost of healthcare (Bughin, Manyika, & Woetzel, 2017).

Technologies Used

We can use the following technologies to automate some process during the medical care service. So that the patient doesn’t have to wait too much to get the medical attention he needs:

· Registration kiosks technology is used all over the world for the self-service process. A company in USA Frank Mayer is providing the services of self-service registration kiosks. The medical care centers could install this technology so that they don’t have to stand in the line long enough just to get registered or fill in their credentials. (Barth)

· Robotics technology can be very useful in hospitals e.g. a hospital in japan use the carrier robots who always wander around the hospital and help the patients to get the directions right and in addition to this they help patients carry their things and also pick up the medicines or anything they need within the hospitalSo robots can minimize the difficult situations which patients have to face why they come to the medical care. (Bloss, 2011)

· Document handling Document management, often referred to as Document Management Systems (DMS), is the use of a computer system and software to store, manage and track electronic documents and electronic images of paper based information captured through the use of a document scanner. By using this technology, Patients don’t have to wait in the lines to get their bills done. They can do it online or they can scan their documents. (Stork, 1995).

Conclusion:

We can easily conclude from this is that technology can make our lives easier and simple. By the use of different technology tools we can reduce our efforts that we need to put in to do a specific task. By introducing the technology in hospitals or medical care centers the life of patients can be quite handy and easy. A patient wouldn’t have to wait 2 hours or get in lines to get the medical care he needs because technology can do many tasks for him which otherwise would take hours for him to do by himself.

References Barth, M. (n.d.). Intelligent Transportation System Technology in a Shared Electric Vehicle Program. Bloss, R. (2011). Mobile hospital robots cure numerous logistic needs. Stork, D. G. (1995). Manual entry interactive paper and electronic document handling and processing system. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2018). National health expenditures 2016 highlights. Published January. Bughin, J., Manyika, J., & Woetzel, J. (2017). A Future That Works: Automation, Employment, and Productivity: McKinsey Global Institute. January 2017.

Title

Epidemiology Unit 2 Assignment 1 Research Design and Methods

Sheet1

Vaccination
Design Explain how this type of design can be   used  Quantitative Topic Qualitative Topic Mixed Methods Topic
Progression of Studies Progression of Studies Progression of Studies
Historical
Descriptive
Correlational
Observational
Evaluation
Experimental
Causal-Comparative
REFERENCES The Scientific Method in Vaccine History | History of Vaccines. (2010). Historyofvaccines.org. Retrieved 23 July 2018, from https://www.historyofvaccines.org/content/articles/scientific-method-vaccine-history
Historical Research Design: Definition, Advantages & Limitations – Video & Lesson Transcript | Study.com. (2018). Study.com. Retrieved 23 July 2018, from https://study.com/academy/lesson/historical-research-design-definition-advantages-limitations.html
What Are Descriptive Statistics? – Definition and Uses – Video & Lesson Transcript | Study.com. (2018). Study.com. Retrieved 23 July 2018, from https://study.com/academy/lesson/what-are-descriptive-statistics-definition-and-uses.html
Ch 2: Descriptive Statistics- Describing Qualitative Data. (2018). YouTube. Retrieved 23 July 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTZrS1KbOK8

Kiara Bonds HMSVB300 Interview

Kiara Bonds

HMSVB300

Interview

April 20, 2018

Shakina Milledge is the founder of FIYA Inc. having started of the firm, having started it with an ideal culture of helping the youth to deal with different issues that revolve around their life. Through FIYA, she is able to impactful not only an individual’s lifestyle, but also influences the various ways that society views different youth choices and understanding the very changing cultural trends that exist in the dynamic youth groups.

1. What does your role at FiYa Inc. entail?

As a founder of the organizational and a board member, my main objectives are to ensure that the organization is achieving its intended goals and that policies are develop with helping the youth understand who they are and acknowledge that nothing is wrong with their physical appearance.

2. As a director do you encounter hostile youth, if yes, how do you deal with the hostile youths?

Instead of the word hostile, I prefer to use the word aggressive, with the aggression being aimed at the wrong aspects or people in society. Yes I do encounter aggressive youth which makes the job harder but at the same time satisfactory when am able to redirect the aggression to productive aspects of society. In dealing with aggressive youth, I choose to identify their preferred fields of interest and help them in direct that aggressive attitude towards them, which helps them to do something constructive and deal with their aggression in an effective manner.

3. When did you decide that devoting your time to the youth was important?

I once had this client who was not sure of what they wanted to do with their image, since they wanted something different to what they friends and parents were proposing. As a cosmetologist, you are able to notice the protest of client’s top different styles and make ups, and when the client is shy and they are not able to express what they want, they are left to the choices made by them by other people. This motivated me to help people to gain the confidence to state what they wanted.

4. What systems has the government put in place to facilitate with your services to community?

The government has neared that when help is required, we get the help of law enforcement authorities while at the same time, our input when it comes to social work is always utilize in the development and implementation of different policies. From time to time, we do get government grants which help us with the financial burden that we bear.

5. As a director, which are the things that you are always looking out for to improve within your organization?

One of the things am always looking to improve is how we relate and understand cultural trends within different youths groups since this helps in improving service delivery.

6. Do you consider the relationship between the family and the community when making a decision on the way forward to incorporate within your program?

Family is the core unit of the society, ad this means that it forms the basis of how the organization operates. For the organization to have an impact on society, it has to convince family units to accept divergent behaviors and opinions which increase accepts. We find that, a child is more comfortable if they are accepted by their family rather than when society accepts them, but there family does not accept their real identity or opinion. So we work with the family unit in mind.

7. Is there any special situation that has stuck with you, or made a mark on your life?

My fist case of child having an argument with their family has always stuck with me. I will always remember how the client did not want to have make-up on as a girl, but when the client sat down; they requested to have a haircut and also have some boyish styles done. This surprised the parent and they did not get to have the makeup done since the parent was adamant she was not paying for the service. This motivated me to start the organization and to indulge in educating people in accepting there image and who they are.

8. Given the opportunity, to speak freely, what would you tell colleagues on the way forward in your career?

Honestly, I always speak freely and regrettably sometimes am bullish, I always ask my colleagues to forget what they believe in and ensure that the youth’s opinions are their main goals and to ensure that they are able to listen to the youth and understand what they are telling them. At times the youth will speak their interest directly and at times it’s in code.

9. Which family values do you think most families should embrace and what would be the easiest way of embracing them?

Unity and tolerance; these are pretty simple to embrace since it means being supportive of each other irrespective of the divergent views.

10. Where do you want your career to lead you to in the human service field, and how are you going about to achieve this?

For now I have no career growth plans, but in future, I want to reach a wider population margin. To achieve this, we are engaging different organizations and societies in ensuring that we can grow to have a bigger impact.

Kiara Bonds

Shakina Milledge is the founder of FIYA Inc. having started of the firm, having started it with an ideal culture of helping the youth to deal with different issues that revolve around their life. Through FIYA, she is able to impactful not only an individual’s lifestyle, but also influences the various ways that society views different youth choices and understanding the very changing cultural trends that exist in the dynamic youth groups.

1. What does your role at FiYa Inc. entail?

As a founder of the organizational and a board member, my main objectives are to ensure that the organization is achieving its intended goals and that policies are develop with helping the youth understand who they are and acknowledge that nothing is wrong with their physical appearance.

2. As a director do you encounter hostile youth, if yes, how do you deal with the hostile youths?

Instead of the word hostile, I prefer to use the word aggressive, with the aggression being aimed at the wrong aspects or people in society. Yes I do encounter aggressive youth which makes the job harder but at the same time satisfactory when am able to redirect the aggression to productive aspects of society. In dealing with aggressive youth, I choose to identify their preferred fields of interest and help them in direct that aggressive attitude towards them, which helps them to do something constructive and deal with their aggression in an effective manner.

3. When did you decide that devoting your time to the youth was important?

I once had this client who was not sure of what they wanted to do with their image, since they wanted something different to what they friends and parents were proposing. As a cosmetologist, you are able to notice the protest of client’s top different styles and make ups, and when the client is shy and they are not able to express what they want, they are left to the choices made by them by other people. This motivated me to help people to gain the confidence to state what they wanted.

4. What systems has the government put in place to facilitate with your services to community?

The government has neared that when help is required, we get the help of law enforcement authorities while at the same time, our input when it comes to social work is always utilize in the development and implementation of different policies. From time to time, we do get government grants which help us with the financial burden that we bear.

5. As a director, which are the things that you are always looking out for to improve within your organization?

One of the things am always looking to improve is how we relate and understand cultural trends within different youths groups since this helps in improving service delivery.

6. Do you consider the relationship between the family and the community when making a decision on the way forward to incorporate within your program?

Family is the core unit of the society, ad this means that it forms the basis of how the organization operates. For the organization to have an impact on society, it has to convince family units to accept divergent behaviors and opinions which increase accepts. We find that, a child is more comfortable if they are accepted by their family rather than when society accepts them, but there family does not accept their real identity or opinion. So we work with the family unit in mind.

7. Is there any special situation that has stuck with you, or made a mark on your life?

My fist case of child having an argument with their family has always stuck with me. I will always remember how the client did not want to have make-up on as a girl, but when the client sat down; they requested to have a haircut and also have some boyish styles done. This surprised the parent and they did not get to have the makeup done since the parent was adamant she was not paying for the service. This motivated me to start the organization and to indulge in educating people in accepting there image and who they are.

8. Given the opportunity, to speak freely, what would you tell colleagues on the way forward in your career?

Honestly, I always speak freely and regrettably sometimes am bullish, I always ask my colleagues to forget what they believe in and ensure that the youth’s opinions are their main goals and to ensure that they are able to listen to the youth and understand what they are telling them. At times the youth will speak their interest directly and at times it’s in code.

9. Which family values do you think most families should embrace and what would be the easiest way of embracing them?

Unity and tolerance; these are pretty simple to embrace since it means being supportive of each other irrespective of the divergent views.

10. Where do you want your career to lead you to, and how are you going about to achieve this?

For now I have no career growth plans, but in future, I want to reach a wider population margin. To achieve this, we are engaging different organizations and societies in ensuring that we can grow to have a bigger impact.

The Extra Mile Club

Kiara Bonds

Professor Glasson

Internship I

February 15, 2018

The Extra Mile Club

Mentoring is a long-term relationship where one focuses on development, growth, and supporting of the mentee. The mentee benefits from the mentor’s wisdom, support, and teachings. The mentors observe and advise on specific behavior and action changes in daily work. Mentees require a combination of mentoring and coaching which are similar but not equally the same. Coaching is a relationship of limited time where the focus is on eliminating or strengthening of given behaviors. Professionals correct behaviors through the help of coaches to help eliminate or correct behaviors that negatively affect their performance. Coaches also help professionals strengthen and support behaviors that lead to better performances in their activities.

I chose to do an intern at The Extra Mile Club (EMC). I was supervised by Priscilla Drake. My job description involved mentoring kids in a after school tutoring program. I also helped with homework and preparing meals. My job description was on target to the task I had to do. In the beginning, being comfortable and effective was the only challenge I faced. When dealing with kids in the pre adolescence stage I felt intimidated. Over time, working with the children in middle school became easier. I found that if you give them respect and a voice they usual were more manageable. The program dealt with human services on faith, family, education, and sports. EMC has a mission to promoted discipline, academics, leadership, sportsmanship, and self-esteem. EMC aims to promote all these virtues in an enjoyable, safe, and healthy environment through serving God and the community. I do, feel like I preformed to the best of my ability. I improved on my duties by using the knowledge that was given by the mentors and applied it to how I interacted with the children. EMC provides mentoring as a form of human services in a holistic approach to the children, for example, tutoring, Bible study, mentoring, and community service projects. At the end of everyday there was a prayer and a positive motivational script read aloud. I believe through the conditioning of the affirmations the children were able to change some of their negative behaviors. One of the affirmation read was, “I can achieve, if I just believe.” They provided a way to expand the children by attending camps, visiting colleges, and participating in the Amateur Athletic Union Sports for children between 6 and 12 years. All the mentors where there on a volunteer basis and was subject to an annual background check. Therefore, everyone was there because they cared. The Extra Mile Club (EMC) is a non-profit organization located in Beaufort, South Carolina. The organization was established in 2008 after the need to develop new positive alternatives in Beaufort by Chris Dantzler. The positive alternatives were aimed at changing the stereotypical images of the children in the community (Extra Mile Club, 2017). The main aim of EMC is to develop self-esteem, confidence, character, leadership skills, and respect for self and others. The EMC mentoring program has packages on mentoring, tutoring, Bible study, community service, camps or combines, conditioning and strengthening, college visits, and AAU Sports.

In the first year after establishment, the organization began by providing mentors to be role models for twenty young men. The mentors were given the responsibility to teach compassion, integrity, accountability, and respect (Donegan-Ritter & Zan, 2014). Chris Dantzler used football during the much time he spent with the young men to develop their athletic skills. Dantzler is committed to the program, and his consistent goal is to develop excellent citizens, students, and athletes. The Amateur Athletic Union program was started for both boys and girls between the age of 6 and 12 years in 2014 after EMC became a 501c3 organization. The organization has been developing over the years, and in 2016 it formed a Board of Directors of eight members. By expanding the program Emc will be a better success. Being able to reach more youth is needed.

The internship offered an opportunity to work and interact with EMC mentors to the young children. One of the most positive experiences I had interning at EMC was getting to know this particular child name Neiamiah. When I first started, I was just as timid to interact with the children as they were to interact with me. I was able to connect with this child through learning. Common core math was something new to me. Neiamiah was able to show me his way of doing math and I learned from him. I was also able to gain the trust of this child through that encounter. Later on, I was able to get through to him one day when he was having a rough time The mentors should act as role models for the young children by spending quality time with the children. At EMC, the children are taken through a mental development process through different forums (Extra Mile Club, 2017). Different stakeholders collaborate to ensure the children are engaged and offered support, encouragement, and fun. Chris Dantzler started this initiative with the hope and confidence that children with mentors and coaches tend to do better in school mainly because of their higher self-esteem.

During the internship at EMC, I learned to be involved in different activities that help to ensure children gain positively from all aspects of the program. EMC offers mentors and coaches skills that enable one to have a better impact on the young children (Extra Mile Club, 2017). Some of the skills I learned while interacting with the young children are that one should be supportive, an active listener, authentic listener, and skills on fostering self-decision-making. The most important role of mentors and coaches at EMC is to offer support and encouragement to the young children. Football is one of the avenues used at EMC to develop some of the skills required for better development. Football instills discipline, tolerance, teamwork, and respect for others among other personal skills. Using sports in mentorship and coaching makes the program more interesting and interactive to the young children.

Mentoring and coaching at EMC involve other elements, for example, tutoring, Bible study, community service, and camps or combines. These elements ensure the program has several benefits to the mentees and satisfaction by the mentors and coaches. The young children benefit from increased high school graduation rates, better attitude towards school, improved interpersonal skills, enhanced self-confidence, and self-esteem. Social-emotional development among the young children improves which leads to better parental relationships and better chances of enrolling for higher education. This program has helped improve the perception of young children at Beaufort, South Carolina (Extra Mile Club, 2017). The youths develop mentally leading to a decreased likelihood of the young children to initiate illegal drug and alcohol use.

The intern experience involved numerous tasks in the mentoring field. The experience also enlightens me on the benefits of being a positive role model to the children. I benefited from improved self-esteem, a sense of achievement, creation of networks, insight to the adolescence and young adulthood. I also benefited from increased patience, improved supervisory skills, and a pool of people I can collaborate with in my personal life. The program offers much help to youths as they go through challenging life changes and transitions. There are healthy and supportive relationships formed at EMC between the mentors and the mentees to ensure the success of the mentoring program.

I also interned at the Wildcats football program. I was under the supervision of Ericka Brown. The mission of the Beaufort Wildcats is to support, encourage and motivate the youth of our community to be the best they can be in all thingsDuring my intern at the program I assisted the main coach with athletic duties and mentoring. Often times, just being supportive to the girls was enough to help strengthen social skills. This intern was a learning process for me. I learned to be creative and patience. Working with the girls taught me to be more uplifting and compassionate. I could have improved my duties by being more creative. The cheer program taught the girls discipline. It push them to be better academic achiever because, being a cheerleader gave them purpose and improved their self esteem. The girls were able to enhance their social learning skills. They were able to express their personality, through cheering.

During my internship I have learned patience, being an active listener, and how to learn from children. When mentoring or teaching a child, things may not always be understood on the first go around. It is more beneficial to take your time and help.

References

Donegan-Ritter, M., & Zan, B. (2014). Reflecting, coaching and mentoring. Early Childhood Education, 93-104.

Extra Mile Club. (2017). What We Do. Retrieved from www.theextramileclub.org: http://www.theextramileclub.org/what-we-do.html

ASSESSMENT OF THE MODULE

THE ASSIGNMENT BRIEF
Session 2017/2018 Ref:
Module: FOOD COMPOSITION, PROPERTIES AND ANALYSIS
Module Code: ACS-5-446
Date:

May 2018

ASSESSMENT OF THE MODULE

A written examination of two hours duration and an assignment of specified word length and structure. The relative weighting of the two elements is 60:40. The pass mark is 40%. Details of these assessments are given below.

THE LABORATORY REPORT (GROUP REPORT)

A laboratory report on proximate analysis is required. All the four labs (determinations of moisture, ash, protein and fat), calculation of carbohydrate (indirect method) and the energy value must be included.

The report must be structured as shown below.

· Title (proximate analysis of milk powder or proximate analysis of sausagemeat).

· Abstract

· Introduction

· Methods

· Results

· Discussion

· Conclusion

· References

· Presentation

· Appendices (where appropriate)

Word length: The limit is 1500. References and bibliographies will not count towards the word length. Any work beyond the word length will not be marked.

Presentation

The coursework must be word-processed, double-spaced and paginated.

Plagiarism Please note that this is a serious issue, refer to the University regulations for further details. Avoid plagiarism.

TEST DATE / SUBMISSION DATE

27th May 2018 & 10th June 2018 (DDS).

SUBMISSION: Please submit through the ‘Turnitin’ link on Moodle.

Please stick to the specifications and avoid late submission.

Late submission will be considered in the light of a valid mitigating circumstance. You should obtain extension from the Course Director.

MARK ALLOCATION AND CRITERIA FOR THE LABORATORY REPORT

· Abstract (5%)

· Introduction (20%)

· Methods (15%)

· Results (20%)

· Discussion (20%)

· Conclusion (10%)

· References (5%)

· Presentation (5%)

The following will be assessed; knowledge, understanding, structure, references, grammar and spelling. The learning outcomes should be shown clearly. The assignment should be concise, structured and well written.

FEEDBACK

Feedback will be given to students 10 to 15 working days after the submission of an assignment

APPENDIX 1 STANDARD FORMAT FOR LABORATORY REPORTS

There are certain rules you should follow in all forms of scientific writing:

· Write in the past tense

· Avoid the use of ‘I’ or ‘We’. Write in the passive tense.

· Always reference your source material fully.

· Use SI units only

· Species names should be given in full, written in italics e.g. Homo sapiens

· Chemical names should be written in full, together with the chemical abbreviation, the first time they are used e.g. sulphuric acid (H2SO4)

· DO NOT copy directly from practical schedules. ALL work must be your own.

The standard format for a scientific report is as follows:

· Title

· Abstract

· Introduction

· Methods

· Results

· Discussion

· Conclusion

· References

· Appendices (where appropriate)

Title

The title should be brief and informative, explaining clearly what the report is about.

Abstract

The abstract should be a short (no more than 200 words) summary of the essential information from the report. It should set out the background, aims methods results and conclusions. The results and conclusions are the most important part of the abstract.

Introduction

The introduction should describe the background and aims of the investigation. It should clearly answer the following questions:

· What has been done before

· What still needs to be investigated

· Why is the work important

· What are the aims of the investigation

Methods

The method section should describe:

· What was done

· How it was done

· What equipment was used

· What statistical tests were used

If you have been working from a detailed practical schedule, do not copy the method but describe any changes that you made. You do not need to list every item used but you should record the details of any analytical instrumentation used – make, model and operating parameters.

You do not need photographs/diagrams of standard items of laboratory equipment.

Results

The results section should describe and show what was found, together with the analysis of the findings. DO NOT interpret or explain the results in this section.

The text should clearly explain the key features of the results and describe what is being shown in each table or graph. Refer to your tables etc. by number. e.g. Table 3, Graph 2

· Every table, graph or diagram should be clearly numbered, in sequence, and have a clear descriptive heading.

· Each table (including title) should fit on one page.

· Each column in a table must have a clear heading, including units of measurement.

· All graphs should be drawn using MS Excel (or equivalent software) – ensure you use the correct graph type for your data!

· Graphs should be large enough for data to be clearly visible.

· Variables must be plotted on the correct axis.

· Axes must be clearly and correctly labelled and units shown.

· Data points must be shown on graph.

· Where a regression line is fitted, the equation and R2 value should be shown.

· Data and results of calculations should be shown to the same number of decimal places as the original measurements.

· Results of statistical analysis should state the name of the test, the test statistic, number of measurements and the level of significance accepted.

Discussion

The discussion should interpret and explain the results of the experiment and relate your findings to other published work.

· Summarise your key results, relating them to the stated aims.

· Discuss each finding in turn, relating to other work where relevant and explaining any differences you may have found from published and/or expected results.

· Identify areas where you had problems and/or potential sources of error (DO NOT simply blame poor results on ‘human error’ or the experiment being ‘too difficult’).

· Identify areas for improvement in the experimental design (DO NOT claim that automated/computerised apparatus would give better results) and suggest how the investigation might be continued.

Conclusion

· Conclude with a paragraph that summarises the key findings and their interpretation.

References

You should include a complete list of ALL the references that you cited in your text, using the Harvard System of referencing (http://www.library.lsbu.ac.uk/helpsheets/hs30.pdf).

References to web sites should include the full web address of the actual site used (not links from search engines) and the date and time the site was viewed.

Appendices

Your results section should contain the key data, but this may have been processed from a larger data set that is not included.

You may occasionally wish to include this raw data and/or additional information, such as print-outs from instrumentation, examples of calculations, etc. in your report for reference. This information should be placed in the appendices. Each type of information should be placed in its own numbered and clearly titled appendix.

Table 1: Measurements of lead, cadmium and biomass at increasing distances from the road.
Distance from Road (m) Pb concentration (ppm) Cd Concentration (ppb) Biomass (g)
0 125
10 118
25 113
50 97
100 70
250 7.5

Figure 1: Scatter graph showing relationship between distance from road and lead concentration

y = -0.469x + 122.4 R² = 0.994

0 10 25 50 100 250 125 118 113 97 70 7.5

Distance from Road (m)

Pb concentration (ppm)

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Chapter Three—The Creative Personality

In this chapter Csikzentmihalyi speculates on what makes an individual creative. So we move to the other half of the what determines where creativity happens; we’re now approaching the idea of the creative individual to try to ascertain what kind of person, mind, self is behind the creative. We might also ask what is personality. What are we looking at or to when we use the term personality. The term seems to imply some sort of individual uniqueness, based on traits, character, “the set of emotional qualities, ways of behaving, etc., that makes a person different from other people.” http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/personality

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At the outset

Csikszentmihalyi asks “what sort of person” is likely to be able to “internalize the entire system that makes creativity possible”

This internalization of the system already suggests that we may be looking at a person who understands some sort or complex set of relationships.

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The answer:

“Creative individuals are remarkable for their ability to adapt to almost any situation and to make do with whatever is at hand to reach their goals.”

This “ability “distinguishes them from the rest of us.”

They are different

Yet, no particular characteristics or “traits” seem necessary for someone to come up with a creative outcome, product, idea, work, or invention that is valuable to the larger culture . . .

So CM there may be no one type or absolutely distinguishable type of creative person.

4

First he asks:

Might genetics predetermine creativity in a given domain?

He answers yes, to some degree . . .

But then he backs off from that by giving examples of historically creative people who were born with diseases or who developed sensory deficiencies, as examples of how genetics may not be that important.

So before defining for us, the characteristics of creative types, or personalities, Csikszentmihalyi, offers a disclaimer—there is no one type, but with that we can still attempt to establish traits or characteristics of the creative personality.

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But, he vacillates once more and claims “a sensory advantage may be responsible for developing an early interest in the domain.”

Thus genetics may not determine creativity, but genetics may determine an interest in a domain. Perhaps, some people are born with an interest in art or music, or mathematics, or science?

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Further, Csikszentmihalhyi adds

“Curiosity, wonder and interest,”

“Openness to experience

“fluid attention that constantly processes . . . environment . . .”

Make for “recognizing interesting problems”

And “recognizing potential novelty”

These may all be attributes of a creative person. Clearly there is nothing new of profound here yet. There must be a myriad of other factors.

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Beyond individual interest and intelligence

As well as interest a “person also needs access to a domain.”

A significantly creative person must have “cultural capital”

A creative person must learn what it takes work in a domain and to know the rules and codes of a domain. Whether cultural capital stems from being born into affluence, having a great coach, or mentor, or having access to a good education. All the intelligence in the world won’t matter without cultural capital. That said, some significantly creative people fight their way to creative prominence from poverty, personal tragedy, trauma and turmoil.

8

Likewise, CM claims

One must also have access to a “field,” Such access can come about in a variety for ways, for example, through . . .

A benefactor

Creative cohorts

University resources and positions

A field is often

limited by stiff competition, an overabundance of people vying for the same positions or

Gatekeepers who restrict access

Because of these factors “access to a field is often determined by chance, or irrelevant factors, such as having good connections.”

“. . . since creativity is the property of a complex system, and none of its components alone can explain it,” CM is hesitant about defining the personality of the creative individual.

And the “personality of an individual who is to do something creative must adapt itself to the particular domain, to the conditions of the particular field which vary at different times from domain to domain”

This suggests that though interest and resources are crucial to creative success, one must have a bit of flexibility to adapt to changes in systems and circumstances.

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So it is not about a particular “personality style.”

A way of behaving, or speaking, or acting are not determinants here. And as Csikszentmihalyi tells us, it is not a matter of greater intelligence, a higher IQ,

12

Creatives in Csikszentmihalyi’s view are different

Because their personalities are complexities

“Instead of being individuals they are multitudes . . .”

“ . . . they tend to bring together the entire range of human possibilities within themselves.”

So how does one become a multitude and how can any one person hold the entire range of human possibilities within . . . are we talking about higher humans? How could this be possible?

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All that aside

For Csikczentmihalyi creatives must have certain characteristics which encompass what he calls “Ten Dimensions of Complexity.” Further these ten dimensions are antithetical to each other.

The Ten Dimensions

Abundance of physical energy/while often quiet and at rest

Smart/Naïve

Convergent/Divergent thinkers

Playful/Disciplined

Responsibility/irresponsibility

Imaginative/realistic

Extroverted/Introverted

Convergent thinking is measured by IQ tests and involves the ability to solve problems that have one correct answer. Divergent thinking leads to no agreed upon solution, suggests flexibility and fluency, or the ability to change views and perspectives

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Continued

Humble/Proud

Ambitious/Selfless are other terms applied here.

Masculine/Feminine—Psychologically Androgynous

Rebellious, Independent/Traditional, Conservative

Willing to take risk, but recognize the importance of previous contributions to a domain

Passionate/Objective

Particularly about their work

Suffering, Pained/Joyful, Exhuberent

Linked to sensitivity as well pleasure in process of creating

Refers to a person’s ability to be at the same time aggressive and nurturant, sensitive and rigid, dominant and submissive, regardless of gender. Here we might do away with terms that hold gender to types. CM clearly does not.

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In the end Csikszentmihalyi admits these ten dimensions are “arbitrary,” and might have excluded other important characteristics of creative people.

But, he maintain the creative person must “operate at both ends of these polarities. . .”

So as I close here I wonder is Csikszentmihalyi on to something here. Or are the assignments of lists and categories to creative types more than arbitrary, but rather based on a limited perspective that continues to want to apply reason, clear designations to complexities that remain almost unnameable, encrypted in unknown workings of mind, body, even spirit, drawn from some unknown dimension . . .

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