Disabilities defined

DR. Von mizener

EDOL 631 5

Advanced Organizer Week 4 class outline

Teaching Exceptional Learners: Sternberg and Williams: Chapter 5

Individual differences in learners

Special education (IEP, LRE, FAPE)

Disabilities defined

Adverse effects

Week 5 class goals

Students will understand special education law that drives current school/educational practices, including

IEP process

Referral process

Parent rights and responsibilities

Ability to define and differentiate characteristics of special education/disability eligibility categories

Students will identify key strategies related to classroom instruction and intervention for students with disabilities

Content – Special Education

Special Education Laws

free and appropriate public education

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Outline student and parent rights and responsibilities

IEP, LRE

Content – LRE

LRE- students must be educated with non-disabled peers to the greatest extent appropriate

GROUPS- breakdown

Define and describe?

What is your experience with mainstreaming, inclusion?

resource/pull-out/CDC?

What “terms” do you use?

What do you think is the right balance?

Content – IEP

Team members

Purposes –

Initial IEP meeting

Annual IEP meeting

Present levels of performance

Goals – objectives (measurable)

services

activity- Referral process

Pre-referral intervention ? Data collection?

Monitor progress

Evaluation – school psychologist / other team members

VIDEO AND REFLECTION re: special education referral and team meeting process

Activity cont.

REFERRAL VIDEO – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v= KrapFXnZIDE

Difficult to identify specific problems, difficult to identify specific interventions

Our goals/ideals vs what actually happens…

Content – Disabilities defined

Disabilities defined:

Licensed medical doctors or psychologists

Follow DSM-IV TR (now DSM 5)

Educational definitions

PL 94-142 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 1975

Each state may be slightly different in terminology

Content – Speech / language

Speech / Language

Example? Stuttering vs. articulation? Vs. language?

repetitions, prolongations, or hesitations in articulation that disrupt the flow of speech

communication disorder such as stuttering, impaired articulation, a language impairment, or a voice impairment that adversely affects a child’s educational performance.

Content – (Specific) Learning disabilities

LD

measured performance in a specific skill is substantially lower than expected based on an individual’s intelligence

“discrepancy scores”

RTI – failure to make progress in “response to intervention”

Reading disability most commonly diagnosed

Pattern of strengths/weaknesses in profile

Content – KY specific SLD

(59) “Specific learning disability” or “LD” means a disorder that adversely affects the ability to acquire, comprehend, or apply reading, mathematical, writing, reasoning, listening, or speaking skills to the extent that specially designed instruction is required to benefit from education. The specific learning disability (LD) may include dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, developmental aphasia, and perceptual/motor disabilities. The term does not include deficits that are the result of other primary determinant or disabling factors such as vision, hearing, motor impairment, mental disability, emotional-behavioral disability, environmental or economic disadvantaged, cultural factors, limited English proficiency, or lack of relevant research-based instruction in the deficit area.

Content – LD cont.

disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in the imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or to do mathematical calculations. The term includes such conditions as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not include learning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor disabilities; of intellectual disability; of emotional disturbance; or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage.

Content – Intellectual disabilities

Intellectual disabilities? (previous MR)

…means significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning, existing concurrently [at the same time] with deficits in adaptive behavior and manifested during the developmental period, that adversely affects a child’s educational performance.

Good instructional practices?

Teach learning strategies

Teach problem solving strategies

Break down lessons/assignments into discrete steps

Teach self-regulation

Focus on concrete vs. abstract

Content – KY mental disability

37) “Mental disability” means that a child has one (1) of the following:

(a) A mild mental disability (MMD) in which:

1. Cognitive functioning is at least two (2) but no more than three (3) standard deviations below the mean;

2. Adaptive behavior deficit is at least two (2) standard deviations below the mean;

3. A severe deficit exists in overall academic performance including acquisition, retention, and application of knowledge; and

4. Manifestation is typically during the developmental period; or

(b) A functional mental disability (FMD) in which:

1. Cognitive functioning is at least three (3) or more standard deviations below the mean;

2. Adaptive behavior deficits are at least three (3) or more standard deviations below the mean;

3. A severe deficit exists in overall academic performance including acquisition, retention, and application of knowledge; and

4. Manifestation is typically during the developmental period.

activity- AD/HD

ADHD

GROUP DISCUSSION

Types

Boys/girls differences and prevalence

Treatment – medication / behavior management

Content – \Emotional/behavioral dx

means a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree that adversely affects a child’s educational performance:

(a) An inability to learn that cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors.

(b) An inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers.

(c) Inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances.

(d) A general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression.

(e) A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems.

The term includes schizophrenia. The term does not apply to children who are socially maladjusted, unless it is determined that they have an emotional disturbance.

Content – KY definition

(a) “Emotional-behavioral disability” or “EBD” means that a child, when provided with interventions to meet instructional and social-emotional needs, continues to exhibit one (1) or more of the following, when compared to the child’s peer and cultural reference groups, across settings, over a long period of time and to a marked degree:

1. Severe deficits in social competence or appropriate behavior which cause an inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with adults or peers;

2. Severe deficits in academic performance which are not commensurate with the student’s ability level and are not solely a result of intellectual, sensory, or other health factors but are related to the child’s social-emotional problem;

3. A general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression; or

4. A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems.

(b) This term does not apply to children who display isolated (not necessarily one (1)) inappropriate behaviors that are the result of willful, intentional, or wanton actions unless it is determined through the evaluations process that the child does have an emotional-behavioral disability.

Content – AUTISM

developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and nonverbal communication and social interaction, generally evident before age three, that adversely affects a child’s educational performance. Other characteristics often associated with autism are engaging in repetitive activities and stereotyped movements, resistance to environmental change or change in daily routines, and unusual responses to sensory experiences.

Content – Other health impairments

means having limited strength, vitality, or alertness, including a heightened alertness to environmental stimuli, that results in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment, that—

(a) is due to chronic or acute health problems such as asthma, attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, diabetes, epilepsy, a heart condition, hemophilia, lead poisoning, leukemia, nephritis, rheumatic fever, sickle cell anemia, and Tourette syndrome; and

(b) adversely affects a child’s educational performance.For example,

ADHD

Seizure disorder

Cerebral palsy

Content – TBI

means an acquired injury to the brain caused by an external physical force, resulting in total or partial functional disability or psychosocial impairment, or both, that adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term applies to open or closed head injuries resulting in impairments in one or more areas, such as cognition; language; memory; attention; reasoning; abstract thinking; judgment; problem-solving; sensory, perceptual, and motor abilities; psychosocial behavior; physical functions; information processing; and speech.

The term does not apply to brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative, or to brain injuries induced by birth trauma.

Content – gifted

Definitions differ greatly by state

May include measures of intelligence, creativity, etc.

Content – Adverse affect

that the phrase “adversely affects educational performance” appears in most of the disability definitions. This does not mean, however, that a child has to be failing in school to receive special education and related services. According to IDEA, states must make a free appropriate public education available to “any individual child with a disability who needs special education and related services, even if the child has not failed or been retained in a course or grade, and is advancing from grade to grade.

Reflections Q/A?

Week 5 class goals

Students will understand special education law that drives current school/educational practices, including

IEP process

Referral process

Parent rights and responsibilities

Ability to define and differentiate characteristics of special education/disability eligibility categories

Students will identify key strategies related to classroom instruction and intervention for students with disabilities

Assignments/Due dates

Week 5 discussion board PROJECT

25 points

Matrix of disabilities and 6 characteristics of each

Use APA style citation and reference page

Use research process to determine characteristics