Guidelines in Developing a Group Proposal and experiential paper

· Introduction of professor

Teen pregnancy has been a public health concern in the United States. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in the year 2015 a total of 229,715 babies were born to women between ages of 15 and 19. Although the rates seem to be lower compared with the previous year, teen pregnancy still remains a pressing matter. In addition, there seems to be health disparities in relation to teen pregnancy, as Hispanic teens are more than two times higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white teens, and American Indian/Alaska Native teens (CDC, 2015). Among some of the risk factors leading to teen pregnancy, it was found less favorable socioeconomic conditions, such as low education, and low income levels of teen’s families. Also, teens who are involved in child welfare system are at higher risk of teen pregnancy than other groups, for example an adolescent who has been in foster care is twice as likely to become pregnant compared to other peers her age. Furthermore, research has provided strong evidence suggesting various risk factors associated with teen pregnancy for the mother and the baby; teen mothers are at a higher risk to drop out of school and live in poverty….

really is something like these

https://brittanycarriero.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/group-theory-final-group-proposal.pdf

free example:

https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/protective/positiveparenting.htm other page you can help. i need Ain my group propousal

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· i need the work finish for friday, the tuesday is the last day, and on monday i need revised again, please help me and i put 5 stars.

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· Teen pregnancy has been a public health concern in the United States. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in the year 2015 a total of 229,715 babies were born to women between the ages of 15 and 19. Although the rates seem to be lower compared with the previous year, teen pregnancy remains a pressing matter. Also, there seem to be health disparities about teen pregnancy, as Hispanic teens are more than two times higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white teens, and American Indian/Alaska Native teens (CDC, 2015). Among some of the risk factors leading to teen pregnancy, it was found less favorable socioeconomic conditions, such as low education, and low-income levels of teen’s families. Also, teens who are involved in the child welfare system are at higher risk of teen Pregnancy than other groups, for example, an adolescent who has been in foster care is twice as likely to become pregnant compared to other peers her age. Furthermore, research has provided substantial evidence suggesting various risk factors associated with teen pregnancy for the mother And the baby; teen mothers are at a higher risk to drop out of school and live in poverty As a teenager, it is easy to enter a potentially risky situation and think, “well that could never happen to me.” Moreover, unfortunately, many adolescents approach the subject of sex with this same mindset and become pregnant each year. For more information see Adolescence Developmental Psychology. In the United States, nearly 72 out of 1,000 teenage girls ages 15 to 19 grow pregnant each year, into adulthood, approximately 750,000 teen pregnancies and 400,000 teen births in the United States. Nearly 3 in 10 girls get pregnant at least once before age 20; higher rates were reported among the youth of color. Subsequent births among teens aged 15-19 represent 18.7% of teen births. This rate was down from 19% in 2008, 19.3% in 2007, and 19.6% in 2006.1 teenagers facing unplanned pregnancies must make life-changing decisions at an age where they might be cognitively unprepared to do so. Society as a whole agrees that teenagers are ill-prepared to deal with the plethora of new responsibilities and life changes associated with motherhood. Researchers, social workers, and government-led groups are actively developing new programs and prevention methods to reduce the number of unintended teenage pregnancies and provide services for pregnant teens. Parents should lead in exploring the causes of teen pregnancies in, coming up with the possible solutions to teenage pregnancies, and offering advisory services to the society regarding the impact of teen pregnancies on social lives of the people in the society. Despite these duties, parenting teens are currently posted with many challenges as many external factors distract the youth; hence, becoming challenging to the parents undertaking the parenting roles regarding teenage pregnancies (Patel & Sen, 2011). This group will be focusing on teenage mothers, ages 14 to 19. Opportunities to master normative developmental tasks specifically for this stage: physical maturation, emotional development, membership in peer groups and sexual relationships A group of parents would be essential to join up their effort in ensuring valuable results regarding the overall struggle to end teenage pregnancies. Adults are needed to be there for the youth, to communicate with them concerning life issues, and spend time with them in their endeavors to guide them where possible (Patel & Sen, 2011). These actions should be done as teens go through many peer-related challenges in their youthful stages so that they can feel that adults have a genuine interest in them. Diaz & Fiel, (2016) provides the positive parenting practices that can be further explored. According to his research, parenting teen is a difficult task, but the parents must ensure that the mentor their children in a positive manner. Many outside influences distract the teens and pose challenges to their behaviors. Such stuff also poses challenges to the parenting behavior, hence; engaging group when parenting will help in the efficient solving of such problems. Diaz & Fiel, (2016) states that youth need adults closer to them since they cannot manage the challenges facing them which might later distract behavior. The essence of integrating the parental effort to address youth issues is to ensure that different ideologies from different parents are in practiced depending on the own challenge that needs addressing. Critical parental responsibility is assisting the teens to understand matters concerning their lives both now and in future. They should be made aware that the outcome of their actions in the future depends on their choices that they make today. By engaging in positive parenting, the adults or rather parents will be able to help the teens to make healthier choices than what they could have made by themselves especially if they integrate their opinions concerning how to help them (Diaz & Fiel, 2016). Therefore, the challenges affecting teens concerning teenage pregnancies should be addressed by a group of parents or adults for the beneficial outcome to be realized. The group will purposely be intended for the America society explicitly targeting the teens’ pregnancy. Various topics address the parenting practices. According to Gubrium, et al. (2016), these topics include the parental monitoring, father’s influence, parental influence on antisocial practices such as gays’ practices and lesbianism, and the parent-teen communication. Having learned the parenting practices, then parents can join efforts as a group to learn the respective protective methods and how to focus on these practices respectively (Gubrium et al. 2016). For example, parents can learn ways in which they can promote positivity on the health results for the antisocial activities such as those of the gays and lesbians. On the other hand, parents can learn how effective monitoring practices can be helpful in addressing teens’ challenges and making healthy decisions while encouraging them to avoid risky behaviors. Rules: These ground rules are in place to create a safe, supportive environment: • Information shared in this group is confidential. Members are asked to refrain from discussing group material outside of the group either with fellow group members or people outside of the group • Every meeting is important. Please plan to be on time and to attend every meeting. Please notify the facilitator as soon as anticipate being late or absent. • It is expected that you talk about experiences and share your reactions to other members experiences. Members are also encouraged to assert boundaries if it ever feels unsafe to go further in a discussion. • Be respectful and courteous of other members and facilitators. • We ask that all cellular phones be turned off during session. If you must leave your phone on, please make it known to the group that you are anticipating a phone call. Charastericts: o Focus clearly on reducing one or more sexual behaviors that lead to unintended pregnancy; o Maintain age-appropriate and culturally relevant behavior goals, teaching methods, and materials that coincide with the sexual experience level of participants; o Allow sufficient time for the presentation of information and completion of assignments; o Involve the participants in order to personalize the information being presented; o Provide necessary information about the risks of sexual intercourse without protection; o Address social pressures to engage in sexual activity; o Give and continually reinforce a clear message about either abstaining from sexual activity and using birth control during sexual intercourse. Part I: Goal Setting: Identify the needs and resources for their community, in order to set goals. • • Step 1) Needs/Resources: Look at what needs and resources in the community must be addressed by conducting a comprehensive needs and resource assessment. Step 2) Goals/Outcomes: Identify goals for the program, the target populations, and desired outcomes (objectives). Develop a logic model to identify the goals and desired outcomes. Part II: Program Planning: Plan for the implementation of program. • • • • Step 3) Best Practices: Identify evidence-based programs, or evidence-informed (i.e., promising or innovative) programs to be used in reaching goals. Research existing programs for pregnant and parenting teens. Step 4) Fit: Make sure the candidate programs under review fit the needs of target population, and the community. Refer back to the needs and resource assessment to guide this process. (See Selecting An Evidence-Based Program That Fits Tip Sheet) Step 5) Capacities: Assess whether the organization has the capacity to implement the candidate programs. Consider staffing, financial resources, leadership, etc. Based on fit with the youth, community, and organization, select an appropriate program to implement. Step 6) Plan: Make a plan to implement the program. Prepare for each activity associated with implementation, including recruitment, training, authorization, implementation, fidelity monitoring, and evaluation. Part III: Program Evaluation: Implement the program and conduct process and outcome evaluation. • • Step 7) Implementation/Process Evaluation: Think ahead about how to determine whether the program has been implemented well. Implement the program and the process evaluation, tracking data such as attendance, participant satisfaction, educator satisfaction, retention, etc. Step 8) Outcome Evaluation: Evaluate whether the program is meeting its goals, reaching its priority population, and achieving desired outcomes. Implement the outcome evaluation, tracking data such as the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors of the priority population. Part IV: Improving & Sustaining Your Program: Continuously work to improve and sustain the program(s); this is an ongoing process. • Step 9) Continuous Quality Improvement: Make a plan for continuous quality improvement (CQI) of the program. Page 6 • Step 10) Sustainability: Consider what will be needed to sustain the program if it is successful. The ten steps identified above provide structure to the program planning and implementation tasks familiar to most organizations. These ten steps are part of the Getting to Outcomes (GTO) framework that incorporates evidence-based approaches, so an organization can utilize an evidence-based approach to providing supports and resources, even if a program proven with rigorous evaluation to change behavior is not available. A group is essential in establishing credible research on a given topic since the contribution by each of the group members can be evaluated for credibility and integrated to form a solid research finding. The type of group to be formed depends on the research that the proposal targets. Therefore, the informal group is recommended as a type of group for the group proposal since the research on teen pregnancy ought to be mainly based on closed-ended questions for more exploration of the topic. The essence of informal groups in a research proposal is to achieve a given objective which is the solutions to teen pregnancy. This type of group will also enable the respondents to give their views freely to any of the group members without feeling insecure against victimization of any kind. The group is purposely intended for the America society specifically targeting the teens’ pregnancy; its likely causes and the possible solutions to them. Therefore, the group targets pregnant teen aged between 14 and 18 years. However, the older population may be sought to offer their perceptions about the teens counterparts’ pregnancies. The group has various objectives sought from the establishment of the group proposal. They include the following: to explore the causes of teen pregnancies in US, to come up with the possible solutions to this menace, and to offer advisory services to the society regarding the impact of teen pregnancies on social lives of the people in the society. Goals and Objectives This group will touch upon many aspects that a teenage mother may deal including empowering them with life choices about their futures and careers, enlarging their support network, helping them accomplish mastery in normal development techniques, and incorporate coping skills and relaxation into their lives. These are the primary issues that will be addressed in order to help reduce the list of risk factors that often target teenage mothers. V. Basic Information The screening process for this group will require an interview and that participants be teenage mother’s that attend the high school. They would be between the ages of 14-19 and have no other diagnosis going on. A maximum of 12 girls at a time is preferred. If more members want to join a second group may be added to accommodate the demand. The group will meet once a week after school for a half hour at a time. The group will run for the entire length of one school semester, or 16 weeks, with no meetings during the summer VI. Basic Ground Rules These ground rules are in place to create a safe, supportive environment: • Information shared in this group is confidential. Members are asked to refrain from discussing group material outside of the group either with fellow group members or people outside of the group • Every meeting is important. Please plan to be on time and to attend every meeting. Please notify the facilitator as soon as anticipate being late or absent. • It is expected that you talk about experiences and share your reactions to other members experiences. Members are also encouraged to assert boundaries if it ever feels unsafe to go further in a discussion. • Be respectful and courteous of other members and facilitators. • We ask that all cellular phones be turned off during session. If you must leave your phone on, please make it known to the group that you are anticipating a phone call. VII. Possible Topics and Therapeutic Techniques This group will use ice breaker activities as the initial way for the members to introduce themselves and get comfortable with one another. We will utilize trust and relationship-building activities to help people develop trust of themselves and each other. These activities will empower these girls and enlarge their social support group. We will use self-reflection exercises to increase insight. .Relaxation techniques and meditation will be taught to aid in stress reduction. The co-facilitators will use art, music, and bibliotherapy as creative techniques to do some self-esteem boosting activities. We will also have a variety of guest speakers from community agencies that can offer services to expand members’ social network. VIII. Best Practices This group was designed by following the Association for Specialists in Group Work Best Practice Guidelines. A professional disclosure statement was sent to all group members. All members have signed consent forms on file. Members were given a list of the group ground rules and these rules will be reviewed doing the first meeting. In addition to ASGW’s Best Practice Guidelines, this group was developed following the ACA’s Code of Ethics. IX. Special Considerations Individual counseling is always made available to anyone in the school who feels that they need it, regardless of if they are in a group or not. The school is made to be a safe environment where everyone has the right to see a counselor if they see fit. If a student comes in with other issues or psychological diagnosis and it appears they need further help they may be referred to the school psychologist to meet with and make sure they are getting all of the help they need since that area may be out of the expertise of the group facilitators. The clients are still very young, but if an issue from their childhood arises and it seems like one that can be worked out in group it will, if it seems like a bigger issue that needs to be addressed more, then a suggestion of individual counseling will be made. The members of the group will be informed that the facilitators are mandative reporters (such as, but not limited to harm to themselves, someone else, threat to their child. If any other issues arose, such as substance abuse, or someone coming to the group while using a substance, as per school policy, they would have to be reported and also referred to the school psychologist. Goals and Objectives This group will touch upon many aspects that a teenage mother may deal including empowering them with life choices about their futures and careers, enlarging their support network, helping them accomplish mastery in normal development techniques, and incorporate coping skills and relaxation into their lives. These are the primary issues that will be addressed in order to help reduce the list of risk factors that often target teenage mothers. V. Basic Information The screening process for this group will require an interview and that participants be teenage mother’s that attend the high school. They would be between the ages of 14-19 and have no other diagnosis going on. A maximum of 12 girls at a time is preferred. If more members want to join a second group may be added to accommodate the demand. The group will meet once a week after school for a half hour at a time. The group will run for the entire length of one school semester, or 16 weeks, with no meetings during the summer VI. Basic Ground Rules These ground rules are in place to create a safe, supportive environment: • Information shared in this group is confidential. Members are asked to refrain from discussing group material outside of the group either with fellow group members or people outside of the group • Every meeting is important. Please plan to be on time and to attend every meeting. Please notify the facilitator as soon as anticipate being late or absent. • It is expected that you talk about experiences and share your reactions to other members experiences. Members are also encouraged to assert boundaries if it ever feels unsafe to go further in a discussion. • Be respectful and courteous of other members and facilitators. • We ask that all cellular phones be turned off during session. If you must leave your phone on, please make it known to the group that you are anticipating a phone call. VII. Possible Topics and Therapeutic Techniques This group will use ice breaker activities as the initial way for the members to introduce themselves and get comfortable with one another. We will utilize trust and relationship-building activities to help people develop trust of themselves and each other. These activities will empower these girls and enlarge their social support group. We will use self-reflection exercises to increase insight. .Relaxation techniques and meditation will be taught to aid in stress reduction. The co-facilitators will use art, music, and bibliotherapy as creative techniques to do some self-esteem boosting activities. We will also have a variety of guest speakers from community agencies that can offer services to expand members’ social network. VIII. Best Practices This group was designed by following the Association for Specialists in Group Work Best Practice Guidelines. A professional disclosure statement was sent to all group members. All members have signed consent forms on file. Members were given a list of the group ground rules and these rules will be reviewed doing the first meeting. In addition to ASGW’s Best Practice Guidelines, this group was developed following the ACA’s Code of Ethics. IX. Special Considerations Individual counseling is always made available to anyone in the school who feels that they need it, regardless of if they are in a group or not. The school is made to be a safe environment where everyone has the right to see a counselor if they see fit. If a student comes in with other issues or psychological diagnosis and it appears they need further help they may be referred to the school psychologist to meet with and make sure they are getting all of the help they need since that area may be out of the expertise of the group facilitators. The clients are still very young, but if an issue from their childhood arises and it seems like one that can be worked out in group it will, if it seems like a bigger issue that needs to be addressed more, then a suggestion of individual counseling will be made. The members of the group will be informed that the facilitators are mandative reporters (such as, but not limited to harm to themselves, someone else, threat to their child. If any other issues arose, such as substance abuse, or someone coming to the group while using a substance, as per school policy, they would have to be reported and also referred to the school psychologist. Goals and Objectives This group will touch upon many aspects that a teenage mother may deal including empowering them with life choices about their futures and careers, enlarging their support network, helping them accomplish mastery in normal development techniques, and incorporate coping skills and relaxation into their lives. These are the primary issues that will be addressed in order to help reduce the list of risk factors that often target teenage mothers. V. Basic Information The screening process for this group will require an interview and that participants be teenage mother’s that attend the high school. They would be between the ages of 14-19 and have no other diagnosis going on. A maximum of 12 girls at a time is preferred. If more members want to join a second group may be added to accommodate the demand. The group will meet once a week after school for a half hour at a time. The group will run for the entire length of one school semester, or 16 weeks, with no meetings during the summer VI. Basic Ground Rules These ground rules are in place to create a safe, supportive environment: • Information shared in this group is confidential. Members are asked to refrain from discussing group material outside of the group either with fellow group members or people outside of the group • Every meeting is important. Please plan to be on time and to attend every meeting. Please notify the facilitator as soon as anticipate being late or absent. • It is expected that you talk about experiences and share your reactions to other members experiences. Members are also encouraged to assert boundaries if it ever feels unsafe to go further in a discussion. • Be respectful and courteous of other members and facilitators. • We ask that all cellular phones be turned off during session. If you must leave your phone on, please make it known to the group that you are anticipating a phone call. VII. Possible Topics and Therapeutic Techniques This group will use ice breaker activities as the initial way for the members to introduce themselves and get comfortable with one another. We will utilize trust and relationship-building activities to help people develop trust of themselves and each other. These activities will empower these girls and enlarge their social support group. We will use self-reflection exercises to increase insight. .Relaxation techniques and meditation will be taught to aid in stress reduction. The co-facilitators will use art, music, and bibliotherapy as creative techniques to do some self-esteem boosting activities. We will also have a variety of guest speakers from community agencies that can offer services to expand members’ social network. VIII. Best Practices This group was designed by following the Association for Specialists in Group Work Best Practice Guidelines. A professional disclosure statement was sent to all group members. All members have signed consent forms on file. Members were given a list of the group ground rules and these rules will be reviewed doing the first meeting. In addition to ASGW’s Best Practice Guidelines, this group was developed following the ACA’s Code of Ethics. IX. Special Considerations Individual counseling is always made available to anyone in the school who feels that they need it, regardless of if they are in a group or not. The school is made to be a safe environment where everyone has the right to see a counselor if they see fit. If a student comes in with other issues or psychological diagnosis and it appears they need further help they may be referred to the school psychologist to meet with and make sure they are getting all of the help they need since that area may be out of the expertise of the group facilitators. The clients are still very young, but if an issue from their childhood arises and it seems like one that can be worked out in group it will, if it seems like a bigger issue that needs to be addressed more, then a suggestion of individual counseling will be made. The members of the group will be informed that the facilitators are mandative reporters (such as, but not limited to harm to themselves, someone else, threat to their child. If any other issues arose, such as substance abuse, or someone coming to the group while using a substance, as per school policy, they would have to be reported and also referred to the school psychologist. Goals and Objectives This group will touch upon many aspects that a teenage mother may deal including empowering them with life choices about their futures and careers, enlarging their support network, helping them accomplish mastery in normal development techniques, and incorporate coping skills and relaxation into their lives. These are the primary issues that will be addressed in order to help reduce the list of risk factors that often target teenage mothers. V. Basic Information The screening process for this group will require an interview and that participants be teenage mother’s that attend the high school. They would be between the ages of 14-19 and have no other diagnosis going on. A maximum of 12 girls at a time is preferred. If more members want to join a second group may be added to accommodate the demand. The group will meet once a week after school for a half hour at a time. The group will run for the entire length of one school semester, or 16 weeks, with no meetings during the summer VI. Basic Ground Rules These ground rules are in place to create a safe, supportive environment: • Information shared in this group is confidential. Members are asked to refrain from discussing group material outside of the group either with fellow group members or people outside of the group • Every meeting is important. Please plan to be on time and to attend every meeting. Please notify the facilitator as soon as anticipate being late or absent. • It is expected that you talk about experiences and share your reactions to other members experiences. Members are also encouraged to assert boundaries if it ever feels unsafe to go further in a discussion. • Be respectful and courteous of other members and facilitators. • We ask that all cellular phones be turned off during session. If you must leave your phone on, please make it known to the group that you are anticipating a phone call. VII. Possible Topics and Therapeutic Techniques This group will use ice breaker activities as the initial way for the members to introduce themselves and get comfortable with one another. We will utilize trust and relationship-building activities to help people develop trust of themselves and each other. These activities will empower these girls and enlarge their social support group. We will use self-reflection exercises to increase insight. .Relaxation techniques and meditation will be taught to aid in stress reduction. The co-facilitators will use art, music, and bibliotherapy as creative techniques to do some self-esteem boosting activities. We will also have a variety of guest speakers from community agencies that can offer services to expand members’ social network. VIII. Best Practices This group was designed by following the Association for Specialists in Group Work Best Practice Guidelines. A professional disclosure statement was sent to all group members. All members have signed consent forms on file. Members were given a list of the group ground rules and these rules will be reviewed doing the first meeting. In addition to ASGW’s Best Practice Guidelines, this group was developed following the ACA’s Code of Ethics. IX. Special Considerations Individual counseling is always made available to anyone in the school who feels that they need it, regardless of if they are in a group or not. The school is made to be a safe environment where everyone has the right to see a counselor if they see fit. If a student comes in with other issues or psychological diagnosis and it appears they need further help they may be referred to the school psychologist to meet with and make sure they are getting all of the help they need since that area may be out of the expertise of the group facilitators. The clients are still very young, but if an issue from their childhood arises and it seems like one that can be worked out in group it will, if it seems like a bigger issue that needs to be addressed more, then a suggestion of individual counseling will be made. The members of the group will be informed that the facilitators are mandative reporters (such as, but not limited to harm to themselves, someone else, threat to their child. If any other issues arose, such as substance abuse, or someone coming to the group while using a substance, as per school policy, they would have to be reported and also referred to the school psychologist. Goals and Objectives This group will touch upon many aspects that a teenage mother may deal including empowering them with life choices about their futures and careers, enlarging their support network, helping them accomplish mastery in normal development techniques, and incorporate coping skills and relaxation into their lives. These are the primary issues that will be addressed in order to help reduce the list of risk factors that often target teenage mothers. V. Basic Information The screening process for this group will require an interview and that participants be teenage mother’s that attend the high school. They would be between the ages of 14-19 and have no other diagnosis going on. A maximum of 12 girls at a time is preferred. If more members want to join a second group may be added to accommodate the demand. The group will meet once a week after school for a half hour at a time. The group will run for the entire length of one school semester, or 16 weeks, with no meetings during the summer VI. Basic Ground Rules These ground rules are in place to create a safe, supportive environment: • Information shared in this group is confidential. Members are asked to refrain from discussing group material outside of the group either with fellow group members or people outside of the group • Every meeting is important. Please plan to be on time and to attend every meeting. Please notify the facilitator as soon as anticipate being late or absent. • It is expected that you talk about experiences and share your reactions to other members experiences. Members are also encouraged to assert boundaries if it ever feels unsafe to go further in a discussion. • Be respectful and courteous of other members and facilitators. • We ask that all cellular phones be turned off during session. If you must leave your phone on, please make it known to the group that you are anticipating a phone call. VII. Possible Topics and Therapeutic Techniques This group will use ice breaker activities as the initial way for the members to introduce themselves and get comfortable with one another. We will utilize trust and relationship-building activities to help people develop trust of themselves and each other. These activities will empower these girls and enlarge their social support group. We will use self-reflection exercises to increase insight. .Relaxation techniques and meditation will be taught to aid in stress reduction. The co-facilitators will use art, music, and bibliotherapy as creative techniques to do some self-esteem boosting activities. We will also have a variety of guest speakers from community agencies that can offer services to expand members’ social network. VIII. Best Practices This group was designed by following the Association for Specialists in Group Work Best Practice Guidelines. A professional disclosure statement was sent to all group members. All members have signed consent forms on file. Members were given a list of the group ground rules and these rules will be reviewed doing the first meeting. In addition to ASGW’s Best Practice Guidelines, this group was developed following the ACA’s Code of Ethics. IX. Special Considerations Individual counseling is always made available to anyone in the school who feels that they need it, regardless of if they are in a group or not. The school is made to be a safe environment where everyone has the right to see a counselor if they see fit. If a student comes in with other issues or psychological diagnosis and it appears they need further help they may be referred to the school psychologist to meet with and make sure they are getting all of the help they need since that area may be out of the expertise of the group facilitators. The clients are still very young, but if an issue from their childhood arises and it seems like one that can be worked out in group it will, if it seems like a bigger issue that needs to be addressed more, then a suggestion of individual counseling will be made. The members of the group will be informed that the facilitators are mandative reporters (such as, but not limited to harm to themselves, someone else, threat to their child. If any other issues arose, such as substance abuse, or someone coming to the group while using a substance, as per school policy, they would have to be reported and also referred to the school psychologist. Goals and Objectives This group will touch upon many aspects that a teenage mother may deal including empowering them with life choices about their futures and careers, enlarging their support network, helping them accomplish mastery in normal development techniques, and incorporate coping skills and relaxation into their lives. These are the primary issues that will be addressed in order to help reduce the list of risk factors that often target teenage mothers. V. Basic Information The screening process for this group will require an interview and that participants be teenage mother’s that attend the high school. They would be between the ages of 14-19 and have no other diagnosis going on. A maximum of 12 girls at a time is preferred. If more members want to join a second group may be added to accommodate the demand. The group will meet once a week after school for a half hour at a time. The group will run for the entire length of one school semester, or 16 weeks, with no meetings during the summer VI. Basic Ground Rules These ground rules are in place to create a safe, supportive environment: • Information shared in this group is confidential. Members are asked to refrain from discussing group material outside of the group either with fellow group members or people outside of the group • Every meeting is important. Please plan to be on time and to attend every meeting. Please notify the facilitator as soon as anticipate being late or absent. • It is expected that you talk about experiences and share your reactions to other members experiences. Members are also encouraged to assert boundaries if it ever feels unsafe to go further in a discussion. • Be respectful and courteous of other members and facilitators. • We ask that all cellular phones be turned off during session. If you must leave your phone on, please make it known to the group that you are anticipating a phone call. VII. Possible Topics and Therapeutic Techniques This group will use ice breaker activities as the initial way for the members to introduce themselves and get comfortable with one another. We will utilize trust and relationship-building activities to help people develop trust of themselves and each other. These activities will empower these girls and enlarge their social support group. We will use self-reflection exercises to increase insight. .Relaxation techniques and meditation will be taught to aid in stress reduction. The co-facilitators will use art, music, and bibliotherapy as creative techniques to do some self-esteem boosting activities. We will also have a variety of guest speakers from community agencies that can offer services to expand members’ social network. VIII. Best Practices This group was designed by following the Association for Specialists in Group Work Best Practice Guidelines. A professional disclosure statement was sent to all group members. All members have signed consent forms on file. Members were given a list of the group ground rules and these rules will be reviewed doing the first meeting. In addition to ASGW’s Best Practice Guidelines, this group was developed following the ACA’s Code of Ethics. IX. Special Considerations Individual counseling is always made available to anyone in the school who feels that they need it, regardless of if they are in a group or not. The school is made to be a safe environment where everyone has the right to see a counselor if they see fit. If a student comes in with other issues or psychological diagnosis and it appears they need further help they may be referred to the school psychologist to meet with and make sure they are getting all of the help they need since that area may be out of the expertise of the group facilitators. The clients are still very young, but if an issue from their childhood arises and it seems like one that can be worked out in group it will, if it seems like a bigger issue that needs to be addressed more, then a suggestion of individual counseling will be made. The members of the group will be informed that the facilitators are mandative reporters (such as, but not limited to harm to themselves, someone else, threat to their child. If any other issues arose, such as substance abuse, or someone coming to the group while using a substance, as per school policy, they would have to be reported and also referred to the school psychologist.