Informative Speech

Specific Purpose

: To inform my audience about the origin, current applications, and

future applications and possible drawbacks of Parallax 3-D technology.

Central Idea

: Parallax 3-D technology is an innovative approach to viewing 3-D without

glasses.

Introduction

I. Introduction

A.

Attention-Getting Story

In 2002, a horror flick called, “The Ring” hit theatres. The basic premise is that

mysterious videotape exists with an urban legend surrounding it. After a victim

watches it, the phone rings, and a voice whispers, “7 days,” telling them they have

only 7 more days to live. Several disturbing images are on this tape, but the most

frightening one is when its creator, a little girl who had drowned, crawls out of the

screen and into the living room. For this scene, no 3D glasses were needed.

B.

Thesis Statement

According to a

Toshiba Mobile Display

press release dated April 27, 2010, Toshiba

president Yoshio Ooido says that a monitor “that enables the user to enjoy three-

dimensional images without the need for special glasses” is now a reality.

(Ooido,

Yoshio. “Toshiba Mobile Display Develops 21-inch Autostereoscopic High-

definition Display.”

Toshiba Mobile Display

27 April 2010).

C.

Preview

Today, I will give you a clearer picture of this new technology, called Parallax 3D, by

first, briefing you on its origins; second, telling you about its current applications; and

third, by discussing its future applications and possible drawbacks.

Body

II.

Origin

A.

It was in 1992 that “Sharp began researching 3-D displays—an exciting new

application that would add to high quality Liquid Crystal Displays,” or LCD’s,

according to March 23, 2010 article, “Sharp’s Hand in 3D Display” in

Develop

magazine

.

(“Sharp’s Hand in 3D Display.”

Develop 23 March 2010.)

B.

Early prototypes consisted of double screens mounted at ninety-degree angles.

C.

“[B]y 1994 Sharp’s researchers managed to get it down to one panel. The next trick

to crack was a screen that could display both 3D images and 2D images,” says Lucy

Sherriff in her August 12, 2004 article, “Sharp’s 3D LCD: How’s That Work Then?”

in

The Register

.

(Sherriff, Lucy. “Sharp’s 3D LCD: How’s That Work Then?”

The Register

12 August 2004).

(Transition: Now that I’ve told you about its origins, we’ll have a better view of its

current applications.)

III.

Current Application

A.

To date, 3D viewing on LCD’s has been made possible through “Parallax 3-D.”

B.

According to a

PC Magazine

review dated November 18, 2003 by Bill Howard,

“[t]o render 3D images, the system uses two… LCD panels that sandwich a parallax

barrier (parallax refers to the difference between what your left and right eyes see

which the brain interprets as 3D.”

(Howard, Bill. “Sharp Actius RD3D”

PC

Magazine

18 November 2003).

C.

Parallax barrier 3D technology “involves dividing the images destined for each eye

into thin vertical strips, and displaying strips from alternate images side by side, or

interlaced,” says Lewis Dartnell in his

New Scientist

article, “Ditch the Glasses for

Lifelike 3D, dated October 1, 2010.”

(Dartnell, Lewis. “Ditch the glasses for

lifelike 3D.”

New Scientist

01 October 2010).

D.

In other words, older versions would have one set of images projected to one eye

and another set to the other eye, relying on special glasses or the brain to refocus,

overlap, and interpret them as 3D.

E.

With parallax, the incoming images come in as thin vertical strips or fine lines like

this,* then are alternated and interweaved

F.

Some of the current uses of Parallax 3D include laptops, cell phones, and airport

security.

G.

The technology had already been applied to laptops, with the Sharp Actius RD3D

as discussed in

PC Mag

article mentioned earlier, and cell phones, with the Sharp

Mova SH251iS handset, described in the Ashley Norris’ December 6, 2002 article,

“The Return of 3D” in

Guardian

newspaper.

(Norris, Ashley. “The Return of

3D.”

Guardian

06 December 2002).

H.

As for airports, stated in the BBC News article, “Easy 3D X-rays for Air Security”

by Jo Twist, “[w]ith 3D technology, an object’s depth and height is seen more clearly

so staff can make better decisions about it.”

(Twist, Jo.

“Easy 3D X-rays for Air

Security.”

BBC News

06 September 2004).

(Transition: Having discussed its current applications, let’s take at look its future

applications and possible drawbacks.)

IV. Future Applications and Possible Drawbacks

A.

Some of the many future uses of Parallax 3D include medical technology and

military defense

i. In hospitals and clinics, X-rays and other images can be viewed in greater

depth.

ii. As for the military, intelligence could have a more detailed view of what

activities their targets are engaging in.

iii. The main drawback to this technology, however, is the limited range of

view.

a.The viewer must be in an exact location to be able to see in 3D because

with any slight change in position and the 3D effect can be lost.

b. Lewis Dartnell in his

New Scientist

article, “Ditch the Glasses for

Lifelike 3D,” dated October 1, 2010, says, “it only works when the viewer is a

certain distance from the screen: stray any further or closer, and the barrier

strips are no longer aligned with image strips, resulting in a blurry mess.”

(Dartnell, Lewis. “Ditch the glasses for lifelike 3D.”

New Scientist

01

October 2010).

(Transition: So today I you a clearer view of Parallax 3D by first, telling you about its

origins; second, telling you about its current applications; and third, by discussing you

about its future applications and possible drawbacks.)

IV. Conclusion

A.

Parallax 3-D technology is an innovative approach to viewing 3-D without glasses.

B.

This development has enabled us to use it wherever applicable—at work, on cell

phones, and with security, just to name a view. With the new Parallax LCD’s, we

can now even enjoy 3D at home. Images would come out from the screen—just

hopefully not scary, crawling, dead people like those in “The Ring.” And whereas

the victims in the movie were left with only 7 days, there’s no countdown for these

displays, which are currently in stores.

C.

We may view the world from two places at once—our right eye and left—but we

live in a 3D world.