Plagiarism

Plagiarism includes any unacknowledged use of material from another source that isn’t considered common knowledge; this includes phrases, ideas, and materials such as graphs, charts, images, videos, and so on. In a written text, it includes neglecting to put someone else’s exact wording in quotation marks; leaving out in-text documentation for sources that you quote, paraphrase, or summarize; and borrowing too many of the original sources’ words and sentence structures in paraphrases or summaries (405).

It is important to be able to tell the nuanced difference between plagiarism and adaptation, collaborative authorship, homage, and pastiche, all of which are creative forms of composing that seemingly overlap with what US academic culture might consider plagiarism. There are, however, important differences. Consider her explanation of these differences below:

Increasingly, texts, research, and writing are made widely available through the practice of “open source” distribution. Open source in general means that a text or other material is made available for public use, sometimes to the extent of appropriation or manipulation of the original work. Not only that, but the widespread practices of sampling, ripping, hacking, and pastiche have led to fluid ideas about the ownership of materials that are copyrighted or in the public domain. Students with an active digital presence will be quite familiar with appropriating source materials without standard academic credit and using them for both their intended purposes and inventing new uses. Collaborative authorship will also mean that you will engage in group research, writing, editing, and idea sharing.

An example of appropriation is the Jay-Z song “Young Forever”, which samples a 1984 song called “Forever Young” by the group Alphaville. The sampling clearly refers a conscientious listener to the original song, giving credit in an audible way to the original artist. In a more academic context, you include all of your group member’s names on an assignment when you are engaging in collaborative writing, giving credit to each member of the group for contributing to the work. These practices of collaboration, adaptation, and appropriation are useful in many circumstances and do not always constitute “plagiarism”, but it is important to understand what plagiarism is in order to avoid it in your writing assignments, presentations, and research. Plagiarism is when you appropriate material—copyrighted or open source—without giving credit to the original author or group, and/or without clearly indicating the origin or source of the material.

Plagiarism can include copying language directly, unacceptable paraphrase, and/or adopting ideas that are not your own without giving credit to the original source. Plagiarism can be intentional, such as buying a research paper online or from a friend, or unintentional, such as a case where you forget to include quotation marks and an in-text citation. It is important to appropriately cite and give credit to sources that influence your ideas and writing, from which you have paraphrased or summarized material, and from which you quote directly. Citing your research and influences is a way of illustrating to your audience that you have credibility, have carefully researched your evidence, and that your writing on the subject should be taken seriously.

You should avoid plagiarism by citing your sources through footnotes and/or in-text citations, according to your professor’s directions, as well as including an appropriately formatted Works Cited page. It should always be clear who or what has influenced your writing and where you have gotten your information. Even in the case of sampling above, Jay-Z clearly indicates the original source of the song. The lesson is that when using or being influenced by the material of others, don’t be Vanilla Ice.

Vanilla Ice - Ice Ice Baby

Image Source: “Vanilla Ice – Ice Ice Baby (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.” by David Erickson (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. is licensed under CC By 2.0 (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Always, always cite your source materials and influences so that you can avoid the penalties for plagiarism.

The best way to learn about a lot of the concepts for college-level reading and composition is to practice, practice, practice. In fact, learning in a concept in a creative way leaves a more memorable impression, as opposed to rote memorization, which is often easily forgotten and therefore not transferred to other learning contexts.

Plagiarism includes any unacknowledged use of material from another source that isn’t considered

common knowledge; this includes phrases, ideas, and materials such as graphs, charts, images,

videos, and so on. In a written text, it includes neglecting to p

ut someone else’s exact wording in

quotation marks; leaving out in

text documentation for sources that you quote, paraphrase, or

summarize; and borrowing too many of the original sources’ words and sentence structures in

paraphrases or summaries (405).

I

t is important to be able to tell the nuanced difference between plagiarism and adaptation,

collaborative authorship, homage, and pastiche, all of which are creative forms of composing that

seemingly overlap with what US academic culture might consider pl

agiarism.

There are, however,

important differences. Consider her explanation of these differences below:

Increasingly, texts, research, and writing are made widely available through the practice of “open

source” distribution. Open source in general means

that a text or other material is made available for

public use, sometimes to the extent of appropriation or manipulation of the original work. Not only

that, but the widespread practices of sampling, ripping, hacking, and pastiche have led to fluid ideas

about the ownership of materials that are copyrighted or in the public domain. Students with an active

digital presence will be quite familiar with appropriating source materials without standard academic

credit and using them for both their intended purpo

ses and inventing new uses. Collaborative

authorship will also mean that you will engage in group research, writing, editing, and idea sharing.

An example of appropriation is the Jay

Z song “Young Forever”, which samples a 1984 song called

“Forever Young”

by the group Alphaville. The sampling clearly refers a conscientious listener to the

original song, giving credit in an audible way to the original artist. In a more academic context, you

include all of your group member’s names on an assignment when you a

re engaging in collaborative

writing, giving credit to each member of the group for contributing to the work. These practices of

collaboration, adaptation, and appropriation are useful in many circumstances and do not always

constitute “plagiarism”, but it

is important to understand what plagiarism is in order to avoid it in your

writing assignments, presentations, and research.

Plagiarism is when you appropriate material

copyrighted or open source

without giving credit to the original author or group, and/

or without

clearly indicating the origin or source of the material.

Plagiarism can include copying language directly, unacceptable paraphrase, and/or adopting ideas

that are not your own without giving credit to the original source.

Plagiarism can be inten

tional, such

as buying a research paper online or from a friend, or unintentional, such as a case where you forget

to include quotation marks and an in

text citation.

It is important to appropriately cite and give credit to

sources that influence your idea

s and writing, from which you have paraphrased or summarized

material, and from which you quote directly. Citing your research and influences is a way of

illustrating to your audience that you have credibility, have carefully researched your evidence, and

that your writing on the subject should be taken seriously.

Plagiarism includes any unacknowledged use of material from another source that isn’t considered

common knowledge; this includes phrases, ideas, and materials such as graphs, charts, images,

videos, and so on. In a written text, it includes neglecting to put someone else’s exact wording in

quotation marks; leaving out in-text documentation for sources that you quote, paraphrase, or

summarize; and borrowing too many of the original sources’ words and sentence structures in

paraphrases or summaries (405).

It is important to be able to tell the nuanced difference between plagiarism and adaptation,

collaborative authorship, homage, and pastiche, all of which are creative forms of composing that

seemingly overlap with what US academic culture might consider plagiarism. There are, however,

important differences. Consider her explanation of these differences below:

Increasingly, texts, research, and writing are made widely available through the practice of “open

source” distribution. Open source in general means that a text or other material is made available for

public use, sometimes to the extent of appropriation or manipulation of the original work. Not only

that, but the widespread practices of sampling, ripping, hacking, and pastiche have led to fluid ideas

about the ownership of materials that are copyrighted or in the public domain. Students with an active

digital presence will be quite familiar with appropriating source materials without standard academic

credit and using them for both their intended purposes and inventing new uses. Collaborative

authorship will also mean that you will engage in group research, writing, editing, and idea sharing.

An example of appropriation is the Jay-Z song “Young Forever”, which samples a 1984 song called

“Forever Young” by the group Alphaville. The sampling clearly refers a conscientious listener to the

original song, giving credit in an audible way to the original artist. In a more academic context, you

include all of your group member’s names on an assignment when you are engaging in collaborative

writing, giving credit to each member of the group for contributing to the work. These practices of

collaboration, adaptation, and appropriation are useful in many circumstances and do not always

constitute “plagiarism”, but it is important to understand what plagiarism is in order to avoid it in your

writing assignments, presentations, and research. Plagiarism is when you appropriate material—

copyrighted or open source—without giving credit to the original author or group, and/or without

clearly indicating the origin or source of the material.

Plagiarism can include copying language directly, unacceptable paraphrase, and/or adopting ideas

that are not your own without giving credit to the original source. Plagiarism can be intentional, such

as buying a research paper online or from a friend, or unintentional, such as a case where you forget

to include quotation marks and an in-text citation. It is important to appropriately cite and give credit to

sources that influence your ideas and writing, from which you have paraphrased or summarized

material, and from which you quote directly. Citing your research and influences is a way of

illustrating to your audience that you have credibility, have carefully researched your evidence, and

that your writing on the subject should be taken seriously.