Plagiarize! Un-Plagiarize! Peer-to-Peer Activity

No unread replies. No replies.

Overview

For this exercise, you will deepen your understanding of plagiarism by first plagiarizing a source intentionally and then “un-plagiarizing it”. This exercise encourages creativity and critical thinking about what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it. Thinking about plagiarism in this creative way is a more effective method for understanding plagiarism than simply reading about it, because it requires critical thinking, which leads to deeper learning. Make sure you have viewed the Canvas page on “Understanding Plagiarism” and read the appropriate chapter in your textbook before attempting this exercise.

Shakespeare Image

Example

Here is an example of how to complete the assignment. You will see further instructions and your assigned passage below the example. Remember to strive for creativity and to think critically!

Original

From Shakespeare’s The Twelfth Night Act III, Scene i

O, what a deal of scorn looks beautiful

In the contempt and anger of his lip!

A murderous guilt shows not itself more soon

Than love that would seem hid: love’s night is noon.

Cesario, by the roses of the spring,

By maidhood, honour, truth and every thing,

I love thee so, that, maugre all thy pride,

Nor wit nor reason can my passion hide.

Do not extort thy reasons from this clause,

For that I woo, thou therefore hast no cause,

But rather reason thus with reason fetter,

Love sought is good, but given unsought better.

Plagiarize!

Ah! Even when he is mad, he still looks absolutely fabulous.

A guilt like one would see on Criminal Minds doesn’t show itself more quickly

Than romance you are trying to keep on the DL; romance’s night is midday.

Cesario, I swear on everything that I love you. Every. Thing.

I am so excited that I just can’t hide it. That’s how much I love you.

But don’t think just because I love you, you don’t have to treat me right and chase me!

I don’t want any scrub-like gentlemen. So if you like it you should probably put a ring on it.

Un-Plagiarize!

In Act III, Scene i of Twelfth Night, Olivia declares that she cannot hide her love for “Cesario.” In her monologue, she states that love cannot be hidden, that in fact it is easier for a murderer to hide his crime than someone who is in love to hide their feelings. Olivia reminds “Cesario” though, that simply because she loves him does not mean that as a woman, she does not wish to be pursued. Her closing line, “Love sought is good, but given unsought better” speaks to the desire she has to be treated romantically by “Cesario”, even though he knows she already loves him (Twelfth Night 3.1.129).

Process and Instructions

As you can see from the example above, the plagiarized version of the soliloquy, though perhaps humorous and creative, is an unacceptable paraphrase of the original text. The writer simply changed some of the words and “updated” it with more recent examples, but it is obviously not the author’s own work. In addition, the writer added another layer of plagiarism by quoting Beyonce without attribution! The “Un-Plagiarize” example, however, is more in line with how you use summary, paraphrase, and quotation in order to cite a source in an academic essay.

Plagiarize! Un

Plagiarize! Peer

to

Peer Activity

No unread replies. No replies.

Overview

For this exercise, you will deepen your understanding of plagiarism by first plagiarizing a source

intentionally and then “un

plagiarizing it”. This exercise encourages creativity and critical thinking about

what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it.

Thinking about plagiarism in this creative way is a more

effective method for understanding plagiarism than simply reading about it, because it requires critical

thinking, which leads to deeper learning. Make sure you have viewed the Canvas page on

“Under

standing Plagiarism” and read the appropriate chapter in your textbook before attempting this

exercise.

Shakespeare Image

Example

Here is an example of how to complete the assignment. You will see further instructions and your

assigned passage below the

example. Remember to strive for creativity and to think critically!

Original

From Shakespeare’s The Twelfth Night Act III, Scene i

O, what a deal of scorn looks beautiful

In the contempt and anger of his lip!

A murderous guilt shows not itself more soo

n

Than love that would seem hid: love’s night is noon.

Cesario, by the roses of the spring,

By maidhood, honour, truth and every thing,

I love thee so, that, maugre all thy pride,

Nor wit nor reason can my passion hide.

Plagiarize! Un-Plagiarize! Peer-to-Peer Activity

No unread replies. No replies.

Overview

For this exercise, you will deepen your understanding of plagiarism by first plagiarizing a source

intentionally and then “un-plagiarizing it”. This exercise encourages creativity and critical thinking about

what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it. Thinking about plagiarism in this creative way is a more

effective method for understanding plagiarism than simply reading about it, because it requires critical

thinking, which leads to deeper learning. Make sure you have viewed the Canvas page on

“Understanding Plagiarism” and read the appropriate chapter in your textbook before attempting this

exercise.

Shakespeare Image

Example

Here is an example of how to complete the assignment. You will see further instructions and your

assigned passage below the example. Remember to strive for creativity and to think critically!

Original

From Shakespeare’s The Twelfth Night Act III, Scene i

O, what a deal of scorn looks beautiful

In the contempt and anger of his lip!

A murderous guilt shows not itself more soon

Than love that would seem hid: love’s night is noon.

Cesario, by the roses of the spring,

By maidhood, honour, truth and every thing,

I love thee so, that, maugre all thy pride,

Nor wit nor reason can my passion hide.