Project Management Group Case Study#8

Sufficient information must be given in the build schedule to identify not only documents produced within the project organization, but also drawings and specifications received from the suppliers of parts and components.

Traceabil ity

In the event of an in-flight malfunction, whether or not an accident results, it is vital to be able to trace all other aircraft in service with the same build, so that faults found in the malfunctioning aircraft can be prevented in all other aircraft in service that have the same build status. The same argument applies, but with greater emphasis, to faults found after an accident.

Prompt traceability is even more important when information from the flight data recorder, cockpit voice recorder, and accident investigation reports has to be acted upon promptly to prevent repeat further tragedies in similar aircraft still in service. Build records need to show not only the build status of the airplane and, in turn, all of its components, but also the source of every component (who made or supplied it). for example, if a bolt fractures because of a flaw in the raw material from which it was made, the investigators must be able to trace back at least to the name of the company that manufactured these bolts so that all other aircraft fitted with them can be identified, grounded, inspected and, if necessary, modified.

clear marking on every assembly of its part number and serial number is another essential part of the traceability process.

CASe exAMPle: A veRSIOn COnTROl PROBleM AnD ITS nOvel SOluTIOn

this case example concerns the same project for the supply of automatic test equipments mentioned earlier in this chapter in the context of a simple change pricing procedure.

At the time of this case, six trailers were parked in the assembly bay undergoing final commissioning before dispatch to the airfield. All trailers were of identical build, but each contained a large number of electronic modules, all individually serial numbered. it was essential for subsequent version control and traceability that the company kept a record of every trailer when it was shipped, with a complete build schedule listing not only the individual module part numbers but also their serial numbers.

commissioning on these ate trailers was a continuous process, running through nights and weekends over several weeks, including times when all the main design staff and managers were asleep or at leisure. unfortunately the commissioning engineers, driven by urgency, developed a habit of exchanging modules between different trailers in attempts to identify faults. Thus build schedule integrity was quickly becoming lost.

the engineering manager solved the problem by purchasing six clock card racks, of the type once common on factory walls just inside the staff entrance. The slots in these racks were labeled so that, for each trailer, one slot corresponded to a module in the trailer. There were sufficient slots to cover all the modules, and each rack was wall mounted adjacent to one of the six trailers. The slot labels were located in a pattern equivalent to the ‘goes into chart’ for each trailer.

a v i a t i o n p r o j e c t m a n a g e m e n t� � �

Flouris, T. G., & Lock, D. (2008). Aviation project management. Retrieved from http://ebookcentral.proquest.com Created from erau on 2018-10-03 14:50:14.

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next, all the inspection tickets were removed from all the modules in all the trailers, and these tickets were placed in their relevant slots in the clock card racks. now each clock card rack was effectively a model of the build schedule for the trailer which it represented.

then, the commissioning engineers were warned, under threat of dire penalty, that every time they swapped two modules between trailers, the relevant final inspection labels must simultaneously be exchanged in the corresponding clock card racks.

Commissioning engineers working late at night, and on long shifts, do not take kindly to clerical tasks. However, they had no excuse for failing to observe the simple system that was asked of them, and the integrity of the build schedules (and version control) was restored.

c h a p t e r � � • m a n a g i n g c h a n g e s � � �

Flouris, T. G., & Lock, D. (2008). Aviation project management. Retrieved from http://ebookcentral.proquest.com Created from erau on 2018-10-03 14:50:14.

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