Unidentified Condition Recap and Response: Cortisol, Bone Loss

Estimated time to complete: 2 hour

In phase two of the Unit 3 discussion, watch or read the presentation posts created by your classmates and consider the information presented.

Assuming the role of a healthcare professional in training, respond via a video or written presentation to (a minimum) of one classmate. Please note that video presentation responses should be a minimum of three minutes in length and should not exceed four minutes. Written presentation responses should be a minimum of 2-3 paragraphs in length per each of the questions listed below.

In the video or written presentation response post, include the following:

Summarize the rationalizations given by your classmate. Has your classmate changed their diagnosis opinion?

Outline the aspects in which you agreed and disagreed with their week 3 conclusions and why.

Provide an additional opportunity and positive impact upon their presentation by expanding upon one aspect of your classmate’s conclusions from week 3 with further research.

Within your video or written presentation, please be certain to validate your opinions and ideas while disclosing the sources utilized within your video presentation or written presentation (APA format).

3 days ago

https://herzing.blackboard.com/images/ci/ng/avatar_150.gifBindu Komara 

RE: Unit 3 Unidentified Condition: Unidentified Condition: Cortisol, Bone Loss – Click here to respond

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

Given the new presenting symptoms listed above, has your diagnosis from week 2 changed? Why or why not?

No, symptoms presented here for the first and second week, both were correlated with the consequences of stress and cortisol production in stress which associated with my choosing diagnosis cardiac metabolic syndrome

Is there a correlation between increased cortisol production and bone loss or are these two separate unassociated symptoms? Rationalize your choice.

Yes! Cortisol is the body’s stress hormone produced in response to stress by the adrenal gland. Production of cortisol interferes with the formation of osteoblast resulting in the decrease in bone building eventually ends with decreased bone density. Hence more breakdown of bone tissues occurred compared with bone deposition. When a patient has an increase in chronic elevation of stress hormones increased the risk of osteoporosis (Cortisol n.d).

Does the current symptom presentation from weeks 1, 2 and 3 align with endocrine (hormonal) imbalances?

Endocrine disorders usually manifest with the neurological symptoms such as a headache to acute encephalopathy which includes coma. Hormone plays an essential role when it comes to the smooth functioning of the body. When it gets altered by either getting increased or decreased resulting in the manifestation of symptoms. If it is diagnosed earlier, can be treated according to symptomatic and case management. Until diagnosis, according to the hormones involved patients manifestations will be there. That’s what the current symptom presentation from weeks 1, 2 and 3 align.

Increase Cortisol level indirectly acts on bone by blocking calcium absorption which decreases bone deposition and increases reabsorption of bone. Due to the reduction in bone mineral density. In Cushing syndrome 70%bone loss takes place. Results in fractures, muscle wasting, high blood pressure which results in increase in the workload on the heart also results in heart disease.

Jennifer Parker 

RE: Unit 3 Unidentified Condition: Unidentified Condition: Cortisol, Bone Loss – Click here to respond

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

Given the new presenting symptoms listed above, has your diagnosis from week 2 changed? Why or why not?

My diagnosis from week 2 has not changed. The symptoms from week 1, 2 and 3 all have similarities. I feel stress plays a big role in some of the symptoms from the previous weeks as well as this week.

Is there a correlation between increased cortisol production and bone loss or are these two separate unassociated symptoms?

Yes, there is a correlation between increased cortisol production and bone loss because Cortisol triggers bone mineral removal to free amino acids for use as an energy source through gluconeogenesis. Cortisol indirectly acts on bone by blocking calcium absorption which decreases bone cell growth. The disruption to serum calcium homeostasis increases bone resorption and ultimately reduces BMD. Even a short bout of elevated cortisol secretion may cause a decrease in BMD. Excessive elevation of cortisol levels, such as in hypercortisolism or Cushing’s syndrome, is linked to a high prevalence of osteoporosis and may be associated with the age-related decrease in BMD in the elderly.

Does the current symptom presentation from weeks 1, 2 and 3 align with endocrine (hormonal) imbalances?

Yes, week 1, week 2 and week 3 all align with endocrine hormonal imbalances. I would say hormones play a huge role in each symptom. Cortisol hormone imbalances can cause mood changes to develop and much more. Bone loss is particular pertinence to menopausal women, who are strongly affected by hormonal fluctuations. Unfortunately, osteoporosis is a very common symptom of menopause.

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jsm/2013/896821/

https://www.34-menopause-symptoms.com/osteoporosis/articles/osteoporosis-and-hormonal-imbalance-the-link.htm

Bottom of Form

Maya Jones 

Maya Jones

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

This week’s symptoms of increased production of cortisol and the loss of bone density goes right along with my diagnoses of either Type 2 diabetes or obesity. Under stressful circumstances cortisol provides the body with glucose. As cortisol provides the body with glucose continually over a long amount of time blood sugars levels raise potentially causing diabetes. A repeated elevation of cortisol also causes weight gain and could eventually lead to obesity. Increased levels of cortisol mobilize triglycerides from storage and relocate those fat cells under the muscles. Throughout a person’s lifetime the body reabsorbs old bone and creates new bone about every 10 years. Your body needs enough calcium D and excercise in life to maintain healthy bones. If a person grows up making bad health choices like not eating meals with the proper amount of calcium and get no excercise at all, they would become obese and be at a much higher risk for loss of bone mineral density.

There is a correlation between increased cortisol production and bone density loss. Cortisol triggers bone mineral removal to free amino acids for use as a energy source. Cortisol indirectly acts on bones by blocking calcium absorption which decreases bone cell growth.

Every symptom since week 1 has had aligned with hormonal imbalances. Cortisol is secreted based on the body’s hormones level to know when cortisol is needed.Elevated cortisol is a automatic factor of a hormonal imbalance going on inside the body.

REFERNCES:

Journal of Sports Medicine. (14 May 2013). Retrieved from: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jsm/2013/896821/

Medline-What causes bone density?.(n.d.) Retrieved from: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000506.htm

Todays Dietician.(n.d.) Retrieved from: http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/111609p38.shtml

· 3 days ago

https://herzing.blackboard.com/images/ci/ng/avatar_150.gif Samantha Dieken 

RE: Unit 3 Unidentified Condition: Unidentified Condition: Cortisol, Bone Loss – Click here to respond  Attachment

· Given the new presenting symptoms listed above, has your diagnosis from week 2 changed? Why or why not?

My diagnosis from week 2 has not changed completely, but I believe there is another diagnosis along with type 2 diabetes. I am curious if there is more than one diagnosis which are linked to type 2 diabetes. Given that the first symptom of this week is an increased production of cortisol, which is a symptom of subclinical Cushing syndrome. Subclinical Cushing syndromes (SCS) symptoms vary from weight gain to increased levels of cortisol, which are two symptoms stated in both this weeks and week ones discussion. Increased cortisol levels over time can lead to increased blood sugar levels which is seen in type 2 diabetes. Low BMD means you are more likely/at greater risk for fractures. People with type 2 diabetes and who have SCS are also at a higher risk for fractures. Fractures can be due to low BMD. In conclusion, I believe it is subclinical Cushing’s syndrome linked to type 2 diabetes.

· Is there a correlation between increased cortisol production and bone loss or are these two separate unassociated symptoms? Rationalize your choice.

Increased cortisol production can decrease bone density by obstructing calcium. Cortisol is a stress hormone and large amounts of cortisol (the stress hormone) can end up blocking bone growth which then decreases the bone mineral density. Being cortisol is a stress hormone, when you are in a chronic state of stress, your bones spill the minerals into the bloodstream and out of the bones. There is a correlation between the two.

· Does the current symptom presentation from weeks 1, 2 and 3 align with endocrine (hormonal) imbalances? Rationalize your answer.

Hormonal imbalances (such as increased cortisol) align with previous symptoms such as insulin resistance, hair loss, blood sugar and weight gain. These were all symptoms in previous weeks which can be caused by hormonal imbalances. The current symptoms of this week align with the past two weeks.

I still believe it is Subclinical Cushing’s syndrome linked with type 2 diabetes.

Bottom of Form

Bottom of Form