Week Two Annotated Bibliography Worksheet

Running Head: Week Two Annotated Bibliography Worksheet 1

Week Two Annotated Bibliography Worksheet 3

Week Two Annotated Bibliography Worksheet

Keisha Thomas

POL201 American National Government

Mark Ladd

August 20, 2018

Topic: The Civil Rights Movement of 1964.

In 1964, the Civil Rights Act ended segregation in public places banning employment discrimination that was based on national origin, sex, religion, race or color. This is considered as one of the most crowning achievements as far as civil right movements are concerned. Despite the strong opposition from the southerners, it was signed into law by Lyndon B. Johnson who succeeded Kennedy. The topic is important to address since it played a vital role in the removal of the procedures and registration requirements that were biased against the underprivileged and minorities (Davis, 2016). Moreover, it also called for the nondiscrimination in fund distributions, public school desegregation as well as the broadening of Civil Rights Commission duties (Percy, 2018).

A. Source 1

Brown, R. L. (2017). Accountability, liberty, and the Constitution. In Bills of Rights (pp. 49-98). Routledge.

In his article Brown (2017) asserts that political accountability in constitutional theory has been misunderstood. This has led to the contribution of the model that places majority rule at the center of constitutional legitimacy requiring special justification for departures. The model offers the start point for much of the modern constitutional theory in the sense that judicial review is branded as a “deviant” institution. History suggests that in America, representation was not designed as a means of people to take part in government but rather as a means for people protecting themselves from the representative government of their own. This explains the reason why people understand the principle of political accountability as a way to protect themselves. People are allowed to check abuse of power as well as overseeing a political structure.

B. Source 2

Rosenbloom, D. H. (2016). 3a. Public Administrative Theory and the Separation of Powers. In The Constitutional School of American Public Administration (pp. 78-94). Routledge.

In public administration, there has been an experience of absent or weak theoretical core (Rosenbloom, 2016). The paper found out that the main problem affecting the public administrative theory emanates from three disparate approaches as to what public administration really is. These approaches are labeled “legal,” “managerial,” and “political”. On public administration, they influence each other in the sense that they overlap following the pattern of the constitutional separation of powers. These approaches are not likely to be synthesized without having to violate the values ingrained deeply in the U.S culture of politics (Rosenbloom, 2016).

C. Source 3

Pettit, B., & Sykes, B. L. (2015). Civil rights legislation and legalized exclusion: Mass incarceration and the masking of inequality. In Sociological Forum (Vol. 30, pp. 589-611).

There was a greater racial equality promised after the 1960s civil rights legislation especially in a variety of domains such as voting, education, and economic opportunity. But the same laws were excluded from surveys that were to gauge their effects. This affected the people’s understanding of the civil rights legislation impacts. In their paper, Pettit & Sykes (2015) designed these laws to be assessed through data obtained from samples of individuals living in households. After a time series analysis of the data was done, it was discovered that the civil rights act is still being undermined. They also found out that even after the legislation being put into effect for more than half a century, there is still the need to redress racial inequities in the U.S.

D. Source 4

Andrews, K. T., Beyerlein, K., & Tucker Farnum, T. (2015). The legitimacy of protest: explaining White Southerners’ attitudes toward the civil rights movement. Social forces, 94(3), 1021-1044.

Andrews, Beyerlein & Tucker Farnum (2015) asserts that activists seek attention for their causes with the aim of winning sympathy from the public. They argue that the proximity to protesting is likely to cultivate positive views pertaining to a movement. Individuals, especially those near centers of movement activities, have higher chances of being more favorable to protests since they are more sympathetic to activists’ demands. They went forward to investigate public support concerning the tactical protest among white Southerners. A representative survey conducted in 1961 was employed whereby about 700 Southerners adults were considered. The study conducted found out that protest won sympathy from a small subset of white Southerners fracturing the consensus in support of Jim Crow segregation (Andrews, Beyerlein & Tucker Farnum, 2015).

References

Andrews, K. T., Beyerlein, K., & Tucker Farnum, T. (2015). The legitimacy of protest: explaining White Southerners’ attitudes toward the civil rights movement. Social forces, 94(3), 1021-1044.

Brown, R. L. (2017). Accountability, liberty, and the Constitution. In Bills of Rights (pp. 49-98). Routledge.

Davis, L. J. (2016). Enabling acts: The hidden story of how the Americans with Disabilities Act gave the largest US minority its rights. Beacon Press.

Percy, S. L. (2018). Disability, civil rights, and public policy: The politics of implementation. University of Alabama Press.

Pettit, B., & Sykes, B. L. (2015). Civil rights legislation and legalized exclusion: Mass incarceration and the masking of inequality. In Sociological Forum (Vol. 30, pp. 589-611).

Rosenbloom, D. H. (2016). 3a. Public Administrative Theory and the Separation of Powers. In The Constitutional School of American Public Administration (pp. 78-94). Routledge.